The Results of the 18th HIA Haiku Contest

 

The Award ceremony for the 18th HIA Haiku Contest was held at “Ichigaya Arcadia” Sunday, 4th December 2016, at 10:30 a.m.

The winning works were announced and Ms. Nguyen Vu Quynh NHU, who is Visiting Research Scholar, International Research Center for Japanese Studies, gave an honorable lecture on the theme “Haiku in Vietnam” in Japanese.

The 18th HIA Haiku Contest

Sponsored by Haiku International Association
Supported by Nihon Keizai Shimbun, The Japan Times

Here are the names of haiku poets and their haiku selected as prize winners and honorable mentions (Non-Japanese Section). Here are also their haiku translated into Japanese by two judges, Mr. Toru Kiuchi and Mr. Toshio Kimura.

 

木内徹選  (Selected by Toru Kiuchi)

 

特選 (Prize Winners)        

 

Laura Nicola (Denmark)    ローラ・ニコラ(デンマーク)

 

Empty street                  人のいない通り 

Birds flying away             鳥が飛び去る

First golden leaf          最初の金色の葉っぱ

 

 

Andrius Luneckas (Lithuania)   アンドリウス・ルネカス(リトアニア)

 

sunflowers field           ひまわりの畑

son asks about              息子が尋ねる

universe               宇宙のことを

 

 

入選 (Honorable Mentions)

 

Anthony Obaro (NIGERIA)    アントニー・オバロ(スイス)

 

noon darkness            昼の暗闇

watery bullet s pound           雨のように銃弾は跳ねる

every roof             どの屋根の上にも

 

 

Angela Cornelia Voss (Germany) アンジェラ・コーネリア・ヴォス(ドイツ)

 

On a park bench            公園のベンチで

I have nothing for you          私はあなたたちに何もあげるものがない  

two sparrows              二羽の雀に

 

 

Pere Risteski (Macedonia)     ベレ・リステスキー(マケドニア)

 

from the rooftops           家々の

of the houses, smoke lifts        屋根の上から、煙が上がる 

light as a breath            吐息のように軽々と

 

 

Anna Switalska-Jopek (Gdansk)              アナ・スウィタルスカ=ジョベク

                                                                                                                         (ポーランド)

 

winter evening             冬の夜

on my tambour frame          私の刺繍枠のうえに

a meadow’s blooming          草原の花が咲く

 

 

木村聡雄選  (Selected by Toshio Kimura)

 

特選 (Prize Winners)

 

Dorota Pyra  (Poland)       ドロータ・ピーラ (ポーランド)

 

cranes in flight              鶴飛ぶや

my father’s worn coat           父の古外套

full of autumn wind            秋風満つ 

 

 

Roberta Beary (U.S.A.)        ロバータ・ベアリー(アメリカ)

 

deep in the cat’s eyes           猫の眼の深く

the crow’s caw caw caw           カラスのカァ・カァ・カァ 

 

 

入選 (Honorable Mentions)

 

Lilia Racheva (Bulgaria)      リリア・ラチェーヴァ(ブルガリア)   

 

traces in the garden            庭の足跡

jasmine                    ジャスミンに

rediscovering me             我ふたたび

 

 

Kwaku Feni Adow (Ghana)    クヮク・フェニ・アドゥ(ガーナ)

 

arriving on the farm –                                            農場に着くなり

the open arms               両手を広げて

of the scarecrow              案山子

 

 

mayflowerbg (Maya Lyubenova)(Bulgaria) メイフラワーbg(ブルガリア)

 

minor seventh…              マイナーセブンス和音

a car door squeaks                       ツグミの歌に  

to the blackbird’s song                                  車のドア鳴く  

 

 

Kjmunro (Katherine Munro) (Canada) kjマンロゥ(カナダ)

 

dark night                 闇夜

every raindrop a star              雨一粒一粒星の

falling                   降る

 

 

                         By Hidenori Hiruta

  (HIA member)

 

 

Let haiku be on the UNESCO list! (50)

 

On April 8, 2016, Mr.  Ali Znaidi in Tunisia, kindly sent me an e-mail as follows.

 

Dear Mr. Hidenori Hiruta,

 

I want to add my voice (Tunisia’s voice) to the growing concern that haiku should be added to the UNESCO list. Although anchored in history (Berber, Phoenician, Roman, Arab, Ottoman, etc) and rich in natural landscapes, Tunisia has no established tradition in creative writing in general and in particular in haiku writings in the English language. Most writers write either in Arabic or French. Haiku writing is not that famous because there are only a couple of writers among those who write creatively in the Arabic and French languages who are interested in writing and publishing this kind of poetry.

 

Humbly and without bragging, I can say that haiku in English made its way to the Tunisian literary scene with my haiku poems featured in international haiku journals and with my haiku book collection Bye, Donna Summer! which was published on March 11, 2014 by Fowlpox Press in Canada. It is a collection of haiku poems written within the traditional 5-7-5 syllable pattern. It is in fact the first Tunisian haiku poetry collection which is originally written and published in the English language.

 

Just a note: There are a couple of aspiring Tunisian poets who are trying their hands at writing haiku in English, but they are not featured in international haiku journals. They only publish some of their haiku poems in their Facebook pages.

 

As I said, some of my haiku poems have been published in international journals and have received haiku awards. The most recent are:

 

a straggly blue light—
the shadow of a dolphin
in my empty room

 

It was awarded a second prize (silver medal) on March 23, 2015 in the UPLI Global Poetry Contest [Category 4-The Prof. Noriko Mizusaki Award] (Philippines/USA).

 

full autumn moon…

an ant carrying away

a pomegranate seed

 

It won Honorable Mention on November 1, 2015 in the 2015 Annual Autumn Moon Haiku Contest run by the Bangor Haiku Group in Maine (USA).

 

full moon…

the weight of

the blood donor’s joy

 

It received a High Commendation in February 2016 in the 2015 Blood Donation Haiku Contest (Croatia).

 

I am supporting haiku as an oldest form of poetry that encompasses simplicity and at the same time enigma and mystery. It’s like nature simple and enigmatic. I would like to add my voice to those who want to make haiku included in UNESCO’s list as a heritage and as a universal form of art not to be forgotten in the midst of a hectic technological era.

 

Here is a photo of Ali Znaidi!

 

Ali Znaidi Headshot

 

Here is his bio!

 

Ali Znaidi (b.1977) lives in Redeyef, Tunisia. He is the author of several chapbooks, including Experimental Ruminations (Fowlpox Press, 2012), Moon’s Cloth Embroidered with Poems (Origami Poems Project, 2012), Bye, Donna Summer! (Fowlpox Press, 2014), Taste of the Edge (Kind of a Hurricane Press, 2014), and Mathemaku x5 (Spacecraft Press, 2015). For more, visit aliznaidi.blogspot.com.

 

Greetings and peace from Tunisia,

 

Ali Znaidi (Tunisia)

@AliZnaidi

 

Lastly, let me take up haiku by Hidenori Hiruta(蛭田秀法), whose pen name is HIRUTA Syuto(蛭田秋稲).

 

初夢や俳星となる我が地球

 

First dream –

let the earth be

a haiku planet

 

This haiku appears in the haiku magazine ‘HI (HAIKU INTERNATIONAL) 2016  No.124’  published by Dr. Akito Arima on May. 31, 2016.

 

HAIKU INTERNATIONAL N0.124

 

HI N0.124(p.35)

 

By Hidenori Hiruta

 

 

 

 

 

Let haiku be on the UNESCO list!

 

On November 3, 2015, Hidenori Hiruta took part in the panel discussion of the Only One Kagoshima Tree Haiku Contest festival held as one of the 30th National Culture Festival Haiku events at the International University of Kagoshima.

Then, Hiruta had a chance to talk about the signatures of 106 haikuists from 15 different countries, who signed to support the initiative to have haiku recognized as important cultural world heritage at the Second International Haiku Conference in Poland, 17 May 2015, at the 19th Haiku Meeting in Croatia, 13 June 2015, and at Gathering of haiku poets in the Castle of Zrinski in Croatia, 12 September 2015.

Here are copies of PowerPoint used in Hiruta’s presentation.

 

国文祭・かごしま(5)

国文祭・かごしま(8)

On September 12, 2015, Gathering of haiku poets was held in the Castle of Zrinski, Brod na Kupi, Delnice, Croatia.

Here is part of a letter Ms. Djurdja Vukelic Rozic, Croatia, sent to Hidenori Hiruta.

Dear Hidenori-san,

this autumn, Croatian haiku poets met in the town of Delnice, county of Gorski Kotar – The green heart of Croatia, for the third time. This gathering adorns a large number of the grammar school children’s works, which you may witness yourself in the joint collection enclosed herewith. Poets from 43 Croatian towns sent their work to the haiku competition.                                                                  

The theme were: a butterfly, the river.                                          

In the name of the adult poets and the children who will carry haiku on in the future, we hope haiku will soon be on the UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage List. For, we have become a large family, connected by haiku. And that’s the wealth we have to care for and preserve for the future generations.

 

Here is a copy in the references used in Hiruta’s presentation.

 

国文祭・かごしま(13)

 

On November 2, 2015, Hidenori Hiruta visited Chiran Peace Park (知覧平和公園) in Chiran, Kagoshima Prefecture by bus.

There is a bronze statue of a kamikaze pilot standing in the Peace Park near Chiran Peace Museum for Kamikaze Pilots (知覧特攻平和会館).                        

 

IMGP2248

 

On May 3, 1974, the Chiran Tokko Irei Kensho Kai (知覧特攻慰霊顕彰会 Chiran Tokko Memorial Association) unveiled this statue based on the design of Ioki Ito, a judge for the Japan Fine Arts Exhibition.

The inscription on the base of the statue says “tokoshie ni” (とこしえに forever).

A plaque next to the statue gives the following information:

 

Origin of Kamikaze Pilot Statue Named “Forever”

In the end, special attack planes never returned.

These brave men must have gone while thinking of their country and parents and hoping for eternal peace.

The kamikaze pilot “Forever” was erected through kind people from around the country.

A brave man who disappeared south of Kaimon,

We pray that his spirit rests in peace forever,

With the desire to immortalize his brave figure.

 

Then, Hiruta visited the Tokkō Peace Kannondō (特攻平和観音堂).  

The Tokkō Peace Kannondō is a temple having a statue of Kannon, the Buddhist Goddess of Mercy inside.

The image enshrined within is a 0.58m(一尺八寸) replica statue of the Yumechigai Kannon (夢違観音 Dream-Changing Kannon), a National Treasure at Hōryū-ji. The names of the 1,036 kamikaze pilots are written on paper within her womb.

 

IMGP2266

IMGP2260

IMGP2261

IMGP2263

 

The Tokkō Peace Kannondō was erected in 1955 thanks to donations collected by Tome Torihama(鳥濱トメ), who ran the Tomiya Inn frequented by the pilots, and who sought to redeem their memory after the war.                                                         Stone lanterns dedicated to the pilots line the approach to the temple.     

 

IMGP2264                                                           IMGP2270

 

Lastly, here is a photo haiku Hidenori Hiruta made during his stay in Kagoshima (鹿児島).

 

知覧の桜

 

秋深し知覧の桜根を広ぐ    秋稲

deep autumn

Chiran cherry trees spreading

their roots

 

On February 1, 2016, the Japanese haiku above appeared with Hidenori Hiruta’s pen name ‘秋稲’in the haiku magazine 『天為』.

This magazine is published by the haiku group Ten’I (Providence) (天為)led by Dr. Akito Arima (有馬朗人), President of the Haiku International Association (HIA) (国際俳句交流協会).

 

知覧の桜(天為)

 

By Hidenori Hiruta

 

Let haiku be on the UNESCO list!

 

On the morning of October 25, 2014, Mr. Masayuki Tsuchihashi, Mr. Hayato Shimokubo, Mr. Takayuki Fukuyama, Ms. Chen Ching Ling (Taiwan), Ms. Rachel Alexandra Bawerbank (UK), and Ms. Jessica Williams (UK) reached Akita Station by bus from Tokyo to take part in the 29th National Culture Festival Haiku events held at the Akita International University. They were students at the International University of Kagoshima, where Mr. David McMurray teaches International Haiku as Professor of Department of International Studies. 

That morning they enjoyed the national culture festival with high school students.

 

国文祭・あきた(1)

 

  That afternoon the students listened to Dr. Akito Arima, the president of the Haiku International Association addressing academics in an effort to convince them that haiku should be added to UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage list.

 

国文祭・あきた(2)

 

Arima reassured students in the audience that haiku can be composed by everyone, from the man in the street to the likes of Swedish poet Tomas Transtromer, the Nobel laureate of literature in 2011 who penned at age 23: disappearing deep in his inner greenness/ artful and hopeful. Later in his career he penned in Swedish:

My happiness swelled

and the frogs sang in the bogs

of Pomerania

By stressing that haiku can deepen mutual understanding and enjoyment of different cultures between those people who read or compose the poem, he garnered support for his idea that “haiku can help make the world peaceful.”

 

A year after, on November 3, 2015, four of the students who attended the 29th National Culture Festival Haiku events in Akita, played leading parts among 26 students who carried out the Only One Kagoshima Tree Haiku Contest festival as one of the 30th National Culture Festival Haiku events in Kagoshima.

Mr. Hayato Shimokubo played a part of a coordinator in the panel discussion, giving me a chance to refer to 27 letters of support of the campaign “Let haiku be on the UNESCO list!” sent by Ms. Djurdja Vukelic Rozic in Croatia and her haiku friends.    

It was also another good chance to show the signatures of 106 haikuists from 15 different countries, supporting the campaign, who signed at the Second International Haiku Conference in Poland, 17 May 2015, at the 19th Haiku Meeting in Croatia, 13 June 2015, and at Gathering of haiku poets in the Castle of Zrinski in Croatia, 12 September 2015.

 

Lastly, here are three pictures taken by Ms. Chen Ching Ling.

 

国文祭・かごしま(1)

 

国文祭・かごしま(2)

国文祭・かごしま(3)

By Hidenori Hiruta

 

Let haiku be on the UNESCO list!

 

On November 17, 2015, Mr. Masayuki Tsuchihashi, graduate student at the International University of Kagoshima, Japan, kindly sent me an e-mail as follows.

 

Dear Mr. Hiruta,

Congratulations on our haiku seminar 3rd November in Kagoshima. Thank you for your support of our project.
Let us think if haiku should be included on a list of the world intangible cultural heritage. I agree! We can understand other cultures by reading a haiku- short poem. Haiku is close to the Japanese heart. What we think of and what old Japanese haikuists thought in the past in Japan. And reading some of them, we are provided with world view.

I am yours.

Masayuki Tsuchihashi Graduate student from International University of Kagoshima

 

On November 3, 2015, the Only One Kagoshima Tree Haiku Contest festival was held as one of the 30th National Culture Festival Haiku events at the International University of Kagoshima.

During the symposium, Dr. Akito Arima explained differences in the way haiku is penned around the world in an address to 150 participants. The president of the Haiku International Association visited with academics at the International University of Kagoshima in an effort to convince them that haiku should be added to UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage list.

In the panel discussion, I talked about what was happening in the haiku world since the 29th National Culture Festival Haiku event was held at the Akita International University on October 25, 2014.

In the beginning, I recited the following haiku as a greeting through PowerPoint.                          This is because Mr. Masayuki Tsuchihashi kindly requested me to write haiku about Kagoshima. He was a group leader among six students from the International University of Kagoshima who attended the Akita haiku event with Professor David McMurray on October 25, 2014.

 

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img176

 

  The catch phrase of the 30th National Culture Festival was 「ひっとべ!かごしま国文祭」, or “ Be active! Kagoshima National Culture Festival” in English.  

 Why were the words “Be active!” used as a catchphrase?

I found out the answer when the guide showed us around 「維新ふるさとの道」, or History Road “Road to the Meiji Restoration” on November 2, in Kagoshima City.

The guide presented us with an Iroha poem Shimazu Tadayoshi (島津 忠良) (October 14, 1493 – December 31, 1568) wrote around 1547.  Shimazu Tadayoshi was a daimyo (feudal lord) of Satsuma Province during Japan’s Sengoku period.

 

いろは歌

 

The Iroha Verses of Shimazu Jisshinko (島津日新公いろは歌) begins with the following words:

Inishie no    Michi wo Kikitemo  Tonaetemo   Waga  Okonai  ni  sezuba

Kainashi

いにしへの   道を聞きても     唱へても    わが  行い  に せずば

かいなし

 

It means,

“Though you have heard and recited

The Way taken for granted

It is of no value in life

Unless it is mastered

And let it be practiced.”

 

Translated by Tsutomu Hamaoka (浜岡勤訳)

 

It also means, “Even if you learn old ways, if you cannot use them as your own, it is meaningless.”

It might mean, “Being active, or taking it into action” is the most important in our lives even today.

 

Lastly, here are two pictures in Kagoshima City.

 

鹿児島国文祭(5)

 

鹿児島国文祭(6)

 

By Hidenori Hiruta

 

The Results of the 17th HIA Haiku Contest

 

The Award ceremony for the 17th HIA Haiku Contest was held at “Ichigaya Arcadia” , Tokyo, Saturday, 5th December 2015, at 10:30 a.m.

The winning works were announced and H.E. Dr. Radu Șerban, Romanian Ambassador to Japan, who is a haikuist, gave an honorable lecture on haiku in English.

 

The 17th HIA Haiku Contest

 

Sponsored by Haiku International Association
Supported by Nihon Keizai Shimbun, The Japan Times

Here are the names of haiku poets and their haiku selected as prize winners and honorable mentions (Non-Japanese Section). Here are also their haiku translated into Japanese by two judges, Mr. Toru Kiuchi and Mr. Toshio Kimura.

 

 

木内徹選  (Selected by Toru Kiuchi)

 

特選 (Prize Winners)        

 

Owen Bullock (Australia)        オウエン・ビュロック(オーストラリア)

 

black swan                        黒い白鳥 

water drops                  水滴が

jewel the neck              首飾りに

 

 

Ernest j berry (New Zealand)      アーネスト・j・ベリー(ニュージーランド)

 

dying oak                枯れゆく樫の木が

by the curator’s home           図書館長の家の横で

limbs akimbo               両枝を腰に当てた恰好に

 

 

入選 (Honorable Mentions)

 

Valeria Barouch (Switzerland)      ヴァレリア・バルーシュ(スイス)

 

Botanical garden            植物園

the café’s empty chairs            そこのカフェに誰も座らない椅子

sparrow perches             雀がとまっている

 

 

Kanchan Chatterjee (India)       カンチャン・チャタジー(インド)

 

long rains…                  長雨-

the night guard’s faint whistle         夜警のかすかな笛の音が  

floats by                 漂い聞こえる

 

 

Nshai Waluzimba (Zambia)        ンシャイ・ワルジンバ(ザンビア)

 

a committee               会合が

gathers in celebration -           祝福のために召集される- 

dying buffalo                 水牛が息絶える

 

 

Sasa Vazic (Serbia.)                                     ササ・ヴァジッチ(セルビア)

 

back to my village…            村に戻る-

more furrows twisted around        また畝が荒らされている

the chestnut’s bark             栗の木の皮が落ちている 

 

 

木村聡雄選  (Selected by Toshio Kimura)

 

特選 (Prize Winners)

 

RaV  (Poland)             ラヴィー (ポーランド)

 

cherry blossom rain              花の雨

just a few heartbeats            鼓動いくつか

from the ground                地面より 

 

 

Adam Augustin (Poland)         アダマ・アウギュスティン(ポーランド)

 

old clock                  古時計

run by finger                 指で回して 

stopped time              時を止める

 

 

入選 (Honorable Mentions)

 

Steven Clarkson (New Zealand)    スティーヴン・クラークソン(ニュージーランド)   

 

a handful                 ひとにぎり

would suffice               ただそれだけで

mountain stars              山の星

 

 

Roberta BEARY  (U.S.A.)       ロバータ・ビアリー(アメリカ)

 

express train                 急行列車

3 seconds                 三秒間の

of sunflowers                ひまわりを

 

 

Valeria Barouch (Switzerland)      ヴァレリア・バルーフ(スイス)

 

Riverbank                川の土手

only clover leaves                  クローバーばかり  

without luck                                     つきも無し  

 

 

Alexey Andreev (Russia)        アレクシー・アンドレーヴ(ロシア)

 

power restored              停電復旧

yet I don’t rush              すぐには蝋燭

to blow out the candle           吹き消さず

 

 

Congratulations to winners!

I am greatly delighted to find haiku by some haiku friends of mine, Ernest J Berry (New Zealand), Kanchan Chatterjee (India), Sasa Vazic (Serbia.), Roberta BEARY  (U.S.A.), and Alexey Andreev (Russia).

Congratulations again!  

                         By Hidenori Hiruta

  (HIA member)

 

 

 

 

 

Let haiku be on the UNESCO list!

 

Here is a photo of the sunrise in the eastern sky of  Sakurajima (Japanese: 桜島, lit. “Cherry Island”), an active composite volcano (stratovolcano) and a former island in Kagoshima Prefecture in Kyushu, Japan. 

 

鹿児島(32)

 

 

On November 27, 2015, Professor David McMurray at the International University of Kagoshima, kindly sent me an e-mail as follows.

 

蛭田先生、 

 

  Thank you for the splendid sunrise photograph. It makes me feel a New Year for international haiku is about to begin.

 

 The Ambassador has printed a wonderful photo and message about Dr. Arima at his facebook site, in both English and in Indonesian please enjoy and copy link it to your Akita pages to further promote our efforts to have UNESCO recognize haiku:

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.958154244272933.1073741909.467975896624106&type=3

 

 Kindest of regards,

  David McMurray

 

Ambassador Bobiash Wins Award – Dubes Bobiash Raih Penghargaan

 

Duta Besar Donald Bobiash baru-baru ini menerima sebuah penghargaaan kebudayaan Jepang untuk puisi haiku. Diserahkan dalam rangka Festival Kebudayaan Nasional Jepang (Kokuminbunkasai), upacara penghargaan ini berlangsung di Kagoshima tanggal 3 November bertepatan dengan Hari Kebudayaan Nasional Jepang. Upacara tersebut dihadiri oleh Dr. Akito Arima, Ketua Asosiasi Haiku Internasional, dan Sadatoshi Tsumagari, Rektor Universitas Internasional Kagoshima. Tema dari acara tahun ini adalah “Hanya Satu Pohon”, yang merujuk kepada satu-satunya pohon yang tersisa setelah tragedi gempa bumi dan tsunami Jepang tanggal 11 Maret 2011. Salah satu penyelenggara utama kompetisi haiku adalah Profesor David McMurray, warga Kanada lulusan Universitas Laval. Dalam sambutannya saat menerima penghargaan, Duta Besar Bobiash menggambarkan haiku sebagai “wahana perdamaian dunia”.

 

Here is a photo of Ambassador Donald Bobiash.

 

鹿児島(36)

 

Ambassador Donald Bobiash was recently awarded a Japanese cultural award for haiku poetry. Presented in the context of Japan’s National Cultural Festival (Kokuminbunkasai), the award ceremony took place in Kagoshima on November 3, Japan’s National Culture Day. Present at the ceremony was Dr. Akito Arima, Chairman of Haiku International Association, and Sadatoshi Tsumagari, President of the International University of Kagoshima. The theme of this year’s event was “Only One Tree”, a reference to a single tree that was left standing after Japan’s tragic earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011. One of the key organisers of the haiku competition was Professor David McMurray, a Canadian and graduate of Laval University. In his remarks accepting this award, Ambassador Bobiash described haiku as a “vehicle of world peace.”

 

Here is a photo of Dr. Akito Arima and Ambassador Donald Bobiash.

 

鹿児島(35)

 

 

Lastly, let me show you a photo of  Professor David McMurray and Hidenori Hiruta.

 

鹿児島(34)

 

 

We sincerely hope a New Year for international haiku begins with the sunrise in Kagoshima, Japan.

 

By Hidenori Hiruta

 

Let haiku be on the UNESCO list!

 

On November 12, 2015, Ms.  Smilja Arsic, Novi Sad, Serbia, kindly sent me an e-mail as follows.

 

Dear Sirs, Hidenori Hiruta-san and Akito Arima-san

Dear Haiku friends!

 

You have my support from all my heart, for entrance of Haiku to The Representative List of the Intangible Curtural Heritage of Humanity.

 

I am afraid that the world has become cruel place for living.

Haiku gives me hope that the nature will remain the nature, and man will remain a man. Haiku is my way to live and my way to love!

 

With regards,

Sincerely

 

Smilja Arsic,

Novi Sad, Serbia

 

 

Draga gospodo Hidenori Hiruta-san i Akito Arima-san

Dragi Haiku prijatelji!

 

Svim svojim srcem pružam podršku uključenju Haiku Listi Nematerijalnog Kulturnog Nasledja Čovečanstva.

 

Bojim se da je svet postao opasno mesto za život.

Haiku mi daje nadu da će priroda ostati priroda i da će čovek ostati čovek. Haiku je moj način da živim i moj način da volim!

 

S poštovanjem,

Iskreno,

 

Smilja Arsić,

Novi sad, Srbija

 

My Haiku

 

There are three lights in                          Tri su svetla moga  

my life: Good, my lovely doughter         života. Bog, moja kći

and Haiku.                                                   i Haiku.

 

A butterfly and                                           Jedan leptir i

yellow withered leaf are                           požuteli suvi list

flying together.                                          zajedno lete.

 

 

Above ripe corn field                                Nad zlatnim žitom

waves of black mane.                               talasa crna griva.

A stray horse.                                             Zalutali konj.

            (Diogen godišnjak “Konji” 2013)

 

Smilja Arsić,

Novi Sad, Serbia

 

 

 

 

Let haiku be on the UNESCO list!

 

Here is a letter of support of the campaign from Ms. Slavka Klikovac, Mojanovići, Montenegro.

The former half is written in Montenegrin, and the latter half in English.

We sincerely wish to appreciate and share it with each other.

 

Dear Hidenori-san, dear Akito-san,

 

sending you my regards from Montenegro.  

Haiku helped me and many Montenegrin authors to connect with poets worldwide. And knowing that everywhere on the Planet there are people who respect Nature, live in a modest way and care for other people in empathy, gives me hope that things will go on just right with this world of ours.  

 

Regards,

Slavka Klikovac, Mojanovići, Montenegro

 

***

            Haiku poezija nije samo književni poetski žanr koji zadovoljava broj stihova u pjesmi i  slogova u stihu, a ni samo poetska slika vezana za prirodu u kojoj se nazire kigo ili godišnje doba. Haiku poezija je način življenja i gledanja nažzivot stvaraoca haiku pjesme. Ona nas zaustavlja da posmatramo, uočavamo trenutke u prirodi koji se događaju sada i ovdje. Za pisanje haiku pjesme nema odlaganja ni predviđanja. Ona ne trpi ni prošlost ni budućnost, ni perifernost prostora. Ona je sadašnjost i ovdje, a zar nije i naš život jedino sada i ovdje! 

 

***

 Haiku poetry is not only a literature genre with the form of certain number of verse lines and its syllables, and haiku is not only a poetical image connected to nature in which one can notice the Kigo, or a year’s season.  Haiku poetry is a way of living and a way of looking at life of the haiku poet. Haiku stops us in order to look, see, view and eavesdrop the moments in nature which happen here and now.  For haiku there is no disposal or prediction.  He does not endure or tolerate future or past, and no periphery of the area whatsoever.  Haiku is present, here and now, and our lives, are they not exactly the same thing, here and now?     

 

Slavka Klikovac, Mojanovići, Montenegro

 

 

Let haiku be on the UNESCO list!

 

Here is a letter of support of the campaign from Mr. Zoran Raonić, Pljevlja, Montenegro.

The former half is written in Montenegrin, and the latter half in English.

We sincerely wish to appreciate and share it with each other.

 

 

Dear Hidenori-san, dear Akito-san,

 

sending you my regards from Montenegro.  

Haiku helped me and many Montengerin authors to connect with poets worldwide. And knowing that everywhere on the Planet there are people who respect Nature, live in a modest way and care for other people in emphaty, gives me hope that things will go on just right with this world of ours.  

 

Sincerely,

Zoran Raonić, Pljevlja, Montenegro

 

***

Haiku poezija u Crnoj Gori odavno ima svoje značajno mjesto. Još od 1928. godine, kada je Miloš Crnjanski preveo i objavio izbor Pjesme starog Japana, i u Jugoslaviju donio jedan sasvim nov (iako u Japanu i na Istoku vjekovima poznat i praktikovan) poetski žanr, ujedno objasnivši sve bitne poetičke odlike te „najkraće pjesme na svijetu“, haiku poezija i ovdje dobija sve više i više pristalica, kako među stvaraocima, tako i među čitaocima. Haiku odavno više nije neka egzotična pojava niti pojava na koju se gleda sa nepovjerenjem, naprotiv, u Crnoj Gori to je već pokret koji predvodi stotinjak stvaralaca te male-velike pjesme o prirodi, rečeno u najširem i najopštijem značenju tog pojma.

   Haiku pjesma opisuje nešto kakvo ono zaista jeste, bez poređenja i bez metafora, što u Crnoj Gori  ima puni smisao čak i kad se poređenje i metafora koriste i više nego je uobičajeno, jer se nešto naše, bez pretjerivanja, ne može upoređivati s drugim – može samo to drugo da se upoređuje sa našim, jer ovo naše je najljepše i najbolje (u protivnom bilo bi grđenje!). Zato haiku pjesma  i jeste naša koliko japanska, i koliko svi uzori na koje se ona oslanja u svom hodu ka Zapadu, gdje tokom cijelog 20. stoljeća dobija sve više i više pristalica, i o njoj se kao o nečemu tuđem i „uvoznom“ (kako neki mrzovoljnici žele da pokude), više i ne razmišlja u ozbiljnim krugovima, jer, pobogu, šta je to više originalno naše ili bilo čije – počev od epa, priče, soneta, romana … Sve ovo poseban smisao dobija nakon proglašenja Crne Gore ekološkom državom, koju su možda samo haiđini dočekali spremno.

 

***

Haiku poetry is an important genre in Montenegro for a long time.  Ever since 1928, when Miloš Crnjanski translated and published a Choice of poetry from the traditional Japan, thus introducing an entirely new poetical genre to Yugoslavia, at the same time explaining all important poetical characteristics of the shortest poetry in the world,  haiku poetry  has its followers, their number growing among creators as well as the readers.  For a long time by now, haiku is not an exotic appearance looked upon with distrust, on the contrary, in Montenegro it is the largest movement lead by about a hundred creators of this small but great poem about nature, told in the broadest meaning of this term.

Haiku poem writes about something the very way it is, without comparison and metaphor, which has a full meaning in Montenegro, where both comparison and metaphor have been used  more than usual, for something that is ours, without exaggeration, cannot be compared with other – only this other can be compared to ours, for our is the most beautiful and the best (on the contrary it would be a vituperation).  That’s why haiku poem is our poetry as much as it belongs to Japan, and as much as all the models on its way to the West are, where during the XX. century it is given more and more admirers, and about it spoken as of something strange and „imported“ (as some “grouches“  wish to scold it), not thought of in serious literature circles, for, for God’s sake, what is more originally ours or anybody else’s – starting with epical poetry, stories, sonnets, novels… All this gains a special meaning after declaring Montenegro and ecological country, and that was perhaps, only to the joy of  ready awaited for by the Montenegrin haijins.

Zoran Raonić, Pljevlja, Montenegro