In the posting this time, I take up AIU Festival 2010 held on October 10-11 at Akita International University(国際教養大学)and the haiku presentation by students at the AIU class of Japanese literature.

 

AIU Festival 2010 (Part 3)

 

The theme is shown in the following photos:

 

 

 

 

Here is a photo of those who enjoyed the festival.

 

 

Our network participated in the festival with the title:俳句とHAIKU INTERNATIONAL HAIKU.

We exhibited haiku poems and haiga paintings contributed to our website by AIU professors, students, and other haiku poets worldwide. We also gave live art of haiga painting and poetry recitation.

During the festival, we enjoyed haiku, haiga painting, and recitations with students, teachers and visitors.

 

Minoru KONO(幸野稔), a tanka poet, gave a tanka recitation for audiences.

 

 

 

Masuda Junko (桝田純子), a haiku poet, gave a haiku recitation too

 

 Haiku Presentaion (Part 3)

 

Professor Alexander Dolin teaches Japanese Literature and Civilization Studies at AIU. He also writes haiku.

 

 

 

Recently Professor Alexander Dolin took up haiku in his class of Japanese Literature, where I participated in the haiku presentation by students as a referee on November 15.

His students kindly contributed their haiku to our netwotk, which I post in the website, dividing them into three parts.

 

 

Gaku Kanno (管野岳) 

 

缶コーヒー広がる湯気と白い息

Kan kouhei  hirogaru yuge to  shiroi iki 

 

 A can of coffee 

steam, and white breath

spreading

  

 

紅葉狩落ち葉の絨毯踏みしめて

Momijigari  ochiba no juutan  fumishimete

 

Hike in autumn colors

stepping on the carpet

fallen leaves

 

 

古き良き古典片手に秋の夜

Furuki yoki  koten katate ni  aki no yoru

 

 Autumn night 

passing with good classics in

my left hand

 

 

秋告げた赤黄の木の葉枯れ落ちて

Aki tsugeta  akagi no konoha  kare ochite

 

Red and yellow leaves 

tell the coming of fall

already gone

 

 

最期まで立派に騒げ秋の蝿

Saigo made  rippa ni sawage  aki no hae

 

Till the end 

make a lot of noise ― 

the fall fly

 

Christine Omiya

 

 

Losing its white form

and with the sun’s radiance

snow melts into spring

 

白き雪日の輝きに春と化す

Shiroki yuki  hi no kagayaki ni  haru to kasu

 

 

From the freezing trees

fall leaves glide down to the ground

chilled by the strong winds

 

凍てし木々秋の葉滑る風の中

Iteshi kigi  aki no ha suberu  kaze no naka

 

A new moon tonight

to illuminate the dark

Are the city’s lights

 

新月の暗やみ照らす街の灯や

Shingetsu no  kurayami terasu  machi no hi ya

 

His body shivers

he cannot win against it

war with the cold night

 

身の震え夜の寒さと戦えり

Mino furue  yoru no samusa to  tatakaeri

 

 

Fresh rain of spring falls

thirsty flowers soak it up

dropped by passing clouds

 

雲降らす春の雨かな花ひたる

Kumo furasu  haru no ame kana  hana  hitaru

 

 

 

Jae Kim

 

 

In the morning

the sight of taxis and business people bustling

near Shinjuku Station

 

せわしさや新宿駅の朝景色

Sewashisa ya  Shinjuku eki no  asageshiki

 

 

A winter night

a pillar of smoke

rising from the quiet campsite

 

冬の夜キャンプサイトの煙草かな

Fuyu no yoru  kyanpusaito no  tabako kana

 

 

Hassled by the dead line

the salary man

drank one shot after another

 

締め切りやサラリーマンの一気飲み

Shimekiri ya  sarari-man no  ikki nomi

 

 

The furious boss

dictatorially

stands above frightened employees

 

独裁や恐れる社員ボスに伏す

Dokusai ya  osoreru shain  bosu ni fusu

 

A drunken student

on a bench

in the park

 

花見酒ベンチの上の学徒かな

Hanami zake  benchi no ue no  gakuto kana

 

 

Herel, I refer to one of ideas of what haiku is.

 

Claire Gardien, a French poet, gave us his idea through exchanged mails.

 Claire Gardienさん 9月25日 8:15 報告

Hello Hidenori,

Could-you tell me, please, why “haiku” is called “hai” (ku) ?
If “hai”, means “crazy” as I think it does, why “hai” or why “crazy” ?
I (personnally) don’t see haiku as something crazy !
Or, does-that mean “humour” (as, past times haikins had humour)?

Thank you to tell me if you don’t mind about it.
I don’t come often on Fb, that’s why I rarely comment photos…

Thanks anyway,
Claire

Hidenori Hirutaさん 9月25日 20:30

Hello, Claire, this is a very good question.

First of all, according to the dictionary of Chinese characters (explained in Japanese), “hai” has three meanings. One of them means “clowns”, afterwards “actors”. The second one means “fun” , or “joke”. The third one means “to wander”, or “to walk right, and sometimes walk left”.
Secondly, “haiku” comes from “haikai, or comic in English” , which was a popular style of Japanese verse originating in the sixteenth century.
As opposed to the aristocratic “renga”, “haikai” was known as the “low style” linked verse intended for the commoner, the traveler, and those who lived a more frugal lifestyle.
Last of all, I would like to refer to “haiku” some day.

Best regards,
Hidenori

Claire Gardienさん 9月30日 11:01 報告

Hello Hidenori,

And, thank you for your nice/ interesting answer.
I can’t help viewing Bashô’s “hai” smile when reading what you wrote ! This “hai” seems to be the correct, good adjective to qualify these sixteenth century’s poets meetings after some lapse of time ; was-it a good way to celebrate some new meeting than to write linked verse together ? It seems so… Anyway, humour is the top word qualyfing “haikai”… “renku”.
Thank you to tell me too, that “haikai” means “renku”. I thought it only meant (or, was an older form) of “haiku”.
I was wondering to; what was the diference between “renga” and “renku”. So, thank you, I can imagine better now.
Can you (and other Japanese people involved in the haiku genre), have that humour spirit they seemed having (although not always writing comic things… The death poems, for instance ? Or, even, when Bashô says that the carps are crying at the end of spring in “te Narrow Road to the North”. This is quite an other world, nowadays.
Here, the sixteenth century was Ronsard and the Rose. It was Montesquieu’s horse travels too, and especially abroad ; his lessons on how to be a good traveller and visiter abroad (particularly interesting when comparing to some narrow to-day’s points of view.
Well, if you have any questions on here, literature, poetry, please ask !

Best regards (and a nice dry autumn),
(“First snow on Mount Fuji”, that was a kigo on Gabi Greve’s pages!
It’ dry, here, but light is declining now.

long summer evenings
when crickets song ang bats fly
(the) butterfly’s last dance…

Claire

Last of all,

In celebration of the coming of the New Year 2011, we hold International Haiku New Year Festival 2011 .

 

This festival is aimed at welcoming the New Year 2011, reciting haiku.

 

Let’s share haiku!     Let’s recite haiku!

 

What is it?

 It is an online festival designed to give our readers an opportunity to share the Japanese short forms of poetry with each other, and enjoy writing, reading, and reciting haiku. 

 

When is it?

We are happy to announce that the Festival with run from January 1st – 3rd 2011.

 

Where is it?

On the website of Akita International Haiku Network

 

How do I get involved?

Please give us a comment on this site, saying that I would like to send two haiku.

Please send the comment by December 23.

You will receive an e-mail from Hidenori Hiruta with his e-mail address.

We sincerely hope that you will enjoy our online festival on the Internet.

 

The next posting ‘Haiku by Tad Wojnicki (2)’ appears on Decembber 18.

― Hidenori  Hiruta

 

 

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Professor Alexander Dolin teaches Japanese Literature and Civilization Studies at Akita International University(AIU). He also writes haiku.

 

Professor Alexander Dolin taught haiku to the students in his class of Japanese Literature and contributed their haiku to our website.

 

 

Ms. Yukari Sakamoto(阪本縁) kindly translated English haiku by Nick Corvinus into Japanese.

She is a graduate student at AIU and sometimes writes haiku in her academic career.

Firstly, we post English haiku by Nick Corvinus and their Japanese translation by Ms. Yukari Sakamoto.

 

Haiku by Nick Corvinus (USA)

Nick Corvinus, a student at Colorado University at Boulder, wrote haiku on November 24, 2009, while studying about Japanese Literature at AIU.

Autumn Haiku  秋に寄せて

                                           Aki ni yosete

Four hours I walk,

The leaves crunch and split apart

Someone is coming.

 

散歩道落ち葉踏みしめ人が行き交う

Sanpo michi  ochiba fumishime  hito ga yukikau 

 

 

As the fire rises

You sit and smoke, while your breath

Goes on forever.

 

落ち葉焚き座って一服煙棚引く

Ochiba taki  suwatte ippuku  kemuri tanabiku

 

 

Where has the sun gone?

It used to follow me home

I’ll drink with the moon.

 

陽(ひ)が隠れ今夜は一人月見酒

Hi ga kakure  konya wa hitori  tsukimizake

 

In my quilted coat

There is an old camera

But no color film!

 

外套と古いカメラとモノクロフィルム

Gaitou to  furui kamera to  monokurofirumu

 

The days are shorter

And while you dress, I see that

You take much longer.

 

一日短かし君の装いひとひの如し

Ichinichi mijikashi  kimi no yosooi  hitohi no gotoshi

 

 

Haiku by Ye Ran Lee (ROK)

Ye Ran Lee, a student at Sogang University, wrote haiku on November 24, 2009, while studying about Japanese Literature at AIU.

1.

The thing falling down

Is the sound of rain drops

The red autumnal leaves

 

散り行くは雨の降る音赤紅葉

Chirikuku wa  ameno furu oto  aka momiji

 

 

The thing which is dyeing

Fallen water of rain

Turning into the red

 

染まるのは落ちた雨水赤色に

Somaru no wa  ochita amamizu  akairo ni

 

 

2.

A golden plain

Of the sunset moment

Shines

 

夕暮れの黄金の原輝きに

Yugure no  kogane no hara  kagayaki ni

 

 

 

Now setting,

From the Setting sun

The given thing

 

沈み行く太陽からの贈り物

Shizumi yuku  taiyou kara no  okurimono

 

 

Or it is

The thing which abundant prosperity

Yields by itself

 

さもないと満ちた豊穣産みし物

Samonaito  michita houjou   umishi mono

 

 

3.

The chilly wind

Causes loneliness, though,

The color itself is warm

 

冷えた風寂しくも色温かな

Hieta kaze  sabishikumo  iro atatakana

 

Haiku by Ayuko Nagata (JAPAN)

Ayuko Nagata, a student at AIU, wrote haiku on November 25, 2009, while studying about Japanese Literature at Professor Dolin Alexander’s class.

身にしみる風が伝える過ぎし秋

mini shimiru   kaze ga tsutaeru   sugishi aki

 

being pierced by the icy wind

the wind tells us

autumn is gone

 

初雪が教えてくれる冬来ると

hatsu yuki ga  oshiete kureru  fuyu kuru to

 

 it is the first snow

that tells us about the fact

winter is coming soon

 

 

秋風と雨雪耐える揺れる柿

aki kaze to  ame yuki taeru  yureru kaki

 

 tolerating the autumn wind

tolerating rain and snow

persimmon is waving

 

The next posting of ‘Haiku by Professor Kirby Record (Part 3) ’  appears on February 20.

 

 

― Hidenori Hiruta