On May 29, 2017, Alexander Dolin says in his e-mail as follows.

Please find attached the file containing 100 haiku by the Russian poets, members of our almanac “Wild Flowers”.

Here we have the works by the winners of a special contest organized for the further promotion of Russo-Japanese poetic contacts on the basis of haiku.

I would appreciate if you could publish the file on the Akita International Haiku… website – better in this bilingual format. Probably the Japanese translation is not so necessary, but of course, if you would like to provide some of the poems with a Japanese version it might be an additional contribution to the project.

 

 

Here are five photos and haiku on Yokote Kamakura Snow Festival, dedicated to the members of the almanac “Wild Flowers” by Hidenori Hiruta.

 

 

Here is a report on Yokote Kamakura Snow Festival.

https://www.jnto.go.jp/eng/spot/festival/kamakurasnow.html

 

A fantastic world appearing on a snow country evening.

Chatting with children in rooms made of snow.

A room made by carving out a mound of snow is called a kamakura. In Yokote City, more than 100 kamakura and countless miniature kamakura are made. The candle lights of these snow white kamakura produce a quiet, beautiful spectacle against the darkness. This 400 year old festival is said to have its origins in the traditional event of returning

New Year decorations to the gods by burning them, and also in the custom of children chasing away birds damaging crops. Inside the kamakura, an altar is set up to honor the water gods and to pray for plenty of clear water, while sake and rice cakes are offered to the gods. Passers-by are invited by the children, in Akita dialect, to come inside the kamakura and drink some sweet fermented rice brew. Everyone has a good time chatting while eating rice cakes and sweets, which is the conventional way of spending time in kamakura. On the other hand, numerous rows of tiny kamakura stand in the grounds of the Yokote Minami Primary School in the city, with the lights shining from within creating a very romantic scene.

Prior to the above festival, the Kamakura Matsuri is held in Akita Furusatomura, where you can experience stepping inside a kamakura. From the end of January to the end of February, famous festivals of Akita Prefecture are represented here, where you can learn about winter in Akita.

At the Yokote Fureai-Center Kamakura House, kamakura displays can be seen all year round.

By Hidenori Hiruta

Advertisements

 

Kamakura Snow Festival(かまくら) is held in Yokete city, Akita prefecture(秋田県), Northern Honshu, Japan on February 15th-16th every year.

It is a fantastic world appearing on a snow country evening, where children enjoy chatting in rooms made of snow.

 

Here are photos and haiku about Kamakura Snow Festival 

 

 

 

羽後の国かまくらの灯の点りけり                 秀法

Ugo no kuni  Kamakura no hi no  tomori keri

 

Kamakura, snow hut

has candles lighted on –

Akita – the land of poetry               Hidenori

 

 

 

かまくらの星座の如き光かな        秀法 

Kamkura no  seiza no gokotki  hikari kana

 

Kamakura, snow huts

shining –

a constellation                         Hidenori

 

 

 

甘酒にかまくらの神酔い痴れる                  秀法

amazake ni  Kamakura no kami  yoishireru

 

god of Kamakura

gets drunk –

amazake, sweet rice drink               Hidenori  

 

 

Manisha Kundu-Nagata in Akita prefecture tells us about Kamakura snow festival in her blog.

 

Please check it out, and you will know about Kamakura better..

http://lipikazuo.blogspot.com/2009/02/kamakura-snow-festival-in-yokote.html

 

 

Lastly, let me post haiku and photos by Janessa and Cecilie Guldbrandsen, who studied about haiku and learned to write haiku at the class by Alexander Dolin, PhD, Professor of Japanese Literature and Civilization Studies at Akita International University(国際教養大学). 

 

Janessa contributed the works of haiku and photos to us in November, 2011.

 

 

蒸気がグラスから立ちのぼる

だけど風が吹き始める

飲めるだろうか?

 

 

 

葉で一杯の川

滝に近づく

それからきれいになるわ

 

 

 

茶色の葉が散り

川の中に落ちるとき

忘れられてしまう

 

 

 

実を結ばない森

枯葉が地上で眠っている

冬が来るだろう

 

 

 

落葉のように

風の中でくるくる回り転がり落ちる

人生行路

 

 

Cecilie Guldbrandsen also contributed the works of haiku and photos to us in November, 2011.

 

Colorful ballet

Written in the air

Gracefully

 

色とりどりのバレエ

空に書かれるように舞う

優雅に

 

Dreaming earth

Breathing the hymn

Of lonely trees

 

夢見る地

賛美歌をささやいている

孤独な木々の

 

Strange chestnut

Roasted in yellow sun

On bare ground

 

風変わりな栗の実

黄色の太陽で焼かれている

むきだしの地面で

 

Leaves rustling

Surrounding patient trees

Wind dancing

 

葉がさらさらと音を立てている

我慢強い木々を取り巻いている

風が踊っている

 

Naked trees shivering

Getting ready for

A new winter coat

 

葉の散った木々が震えている

準備を調えている

新しい冬のコートに

 

 

The next posting ‘For New Year 2012 (9)’ appears on March 3.

 

― Hidenori Hiruta

 

First of all,  I’d like to introduce Alan Summers to you.

He is founder / tutor of With Words which promotes the love of words through a number of inclusive literacy and literature events; courses; activities; workshops; writing walks; and renga projects.

The With Words website: www.withwords.org.uk

Alan Summers also has his Blog: http://area17.blogspot.com

According to his self-introduction, he is Japan Times award-winning writer for haiku  & renga.  He is Joint Co-ordinator for the 1000 Verse Renga.  He is also  Co-organiser for The Summer Japanese Arts & Film Festival 2010 in Bath U.K.

 

Secondly, we  post Alan Summers’ Travelogue on World Haiku Festival 2002 in Yuwa, Akita Japan.  He kindly contributed his article to our website.

 

Bullet Trains, Vending Machines and Cicadas

(group photo©Alan Summers/With Words)

 

L-R standing: Matsuko Teraoka, Deborah Russell, Alan Summers, Daniel Gallimore, Susumu Takiguchi, Debi Bender, Matsuo Basho (statue), Judit Vihar, Bruce Ross.

L-R seated: Brian Selby, David Barsky, Visnja McMaster

World Haiku Festival 2002

The beginning…

I landed at Kansai Airport, Osaka, in early September to be met by friend and fellow writer Maki Nishida, and I stayed at her parent’s house while Maki and myself took in all the sights of Osaka, and Kobe where her family live. My jetlag never stood a chance as over the next two days, we spent anything up to 18 hours a day on each city. The restaurants were good, but they could not get near to the excellence of mood, atmosphere, and culinary experience that Maki’s mother, Akiko Nishida, provided. During the waking hours of those two days, so much was packed in, and although it was not the New Year, we played a game of hyakunin-isshu before visiting Sumadera.

in-between seasons

the tsukutsukubõshi buzz

of “not yet Autumn”

Maki Nishida explained about a samurai legend at Suma Temple about cicadas and their semi-no-koe (chorus), a rasping call that made me think of a single, large bird rather than small insects.  This particular cicada chorus in September is often associated with the ‘official’ end to summer.

So, when the tsukutsukubõshi (cicada species, meimuna opalifera, nicknamed after their sound) give cry, it is the end of summer, rather than the beginning as is the case with all other cicadas; and it also signifies ‘not yet autumn’ at the same time, so says another legend. This is the country of legends, and you never know whether they will remain dormant or not.

The days with Maki and her family set me up beautifully for the rest of my Japan experience which would delightfully end at Akita. There are far too many images of Japan to put down here, though a few would be Bullet Trains, onsen, cicadas and jido-hanbaiki…

vending machines

the hot choice is always out–

Narrow Road to the North

And so, onto the Bullet Train…

Shin-Kobe

a dog shape balloon

wags it tail

…to Kamakura to meet up with other haiku poets for a haiku experience organised through the World Haiku Club by the indefatigable energies of its Chairman, Susumu Takiguchi, and fantastically assisted by WHC Development Advisor, Debi Bender. Throughout this adventure it seemed that both Susumu and Debi worked 24/7 to make sure everything we needed was superbly taken care of.

This was indeed going to be a major expedition where we would retrace some of Basho’s steps, and with the aid of the magical onsen, I was able to recover from a severely swollen ankle originating in England. 

Thanks to Susumu’s perseverance to get me to regularly use the communal onsen ‘hot springs’ at various ryokan (Japanese-style hotels), my ankle quickly became less swollen.  In fact, to the point that I was able to undertake walks up and down hills and mountains that I would otherwise have been only able to view from ground level.

I was looking for Basho, and on our Far North journey, I felt I saw little glimpses here and there…

Toshugu shrine pines

I try to stay as still –

mist and dew

Kamakura was the start of this Basho inspired adventure and the meeting of numerous companions. I was very honoured to meet James Hackett, the famous haiku poet and friend of RH Blyth, with his wife Patricia Hackett, who is a very fine haiku poet too, as I found out at various kukai that were organised. They were the best companions to have on this journey, and I still pinch myself, after having met one of my biggest heroes of Western haiku.

Meeting Dorothy Britton (Lady Bouchier) at Kamakura was incredible too. Dorothy Britton had only just arrived from the U.S.A. and was immediately involved with the WHC Kamakura event, preparing for a talk to a large attentive audience, and also adding simultaneous translation to a talk by James W. Hackett. She looked so fresh and elegant while I was  bedraggled with fatigue.

There were several other Kamakura highlights including sharing a great sense of humour with American artist and haiku writer Deborah Russell, and meeting fellow haijinx online ‘humor in haiku’ magazine colleague, Carmen Sterba.

Carmen and myself temporarily left the WHC crew to take up an opportunity to stay at Kris Kondo’s house; Kris took us back to her fantastic Aladdin’s cave aka apartment. The next day I said farewell to Kris (thank you Kris for being such a fine hostess), all too, too brief a stay, and left with Carmen to catch up with the WHC party starting their next leg inTokyo.

Carmen Sterba and myself had the best of the day together, just two poets strolling around part of Tokyo, and then on to the Basho Memorial Museum where the other poets caught up with us. It is so refreshing to be able to meet up with people you want to meet, but have only ever known via email. I certainly made an effort to make the most of the remaining time to get to know so many haiku poets I might never meet again in person.

I was fortunate to spend time in the company of Visnja McMaster of Zabreb, Croatia, the inventor of the ‘Haiku Cards’ teaching game. Visnja has unselfishly done so much with, and for, Croatian children, proving what a powerful tool haiku can be to lift children away from certain everyday harsh circumstances, including the after effects of the breakup of the old Yugoslavia.

Working with Visnja was a major highlight for me, playing the ‘Haiku Cards’ game with her, and workshopping with several groups of local Japanese schoolchildren in Akita; a time that I shall never forget.

Other poets I met, who are also groundbreaking in their haiku and renku, were Ikuyo Yoshimura and Eiko Yachimoto, great ambassadors, each respectively of those art forms — which brings me to an observation: I have mostly named women!

Other than the exceptions of James Hackett and Susumu Takiguchi, this has been a catalogue of the female persuasion, and so I must make amends.

So, in this spirit, I must tell of a fellow traveller harking from Oxford, who exuded the spirit of Basho that I was so desperately seeking. This traveller was Brian Selby. Of all the people present, he seemed to have that intriguing mixture of pure honesty, gentleness, generosity, sabi and other haikai characteristics about him, that makes me feel that Basho would have liked him very much for a travelling companion. I certainly did. 

Sadly Brian Selby passed away before I could meet up with him again in Oxford, England but I have never forgotten him.

WHC’s Japan experience held many adventures and treats including a trip down the Mogami River…

in-between season

I follow the Mogami River

by riceboat

…and visiting hills, shrines and their flower gardens, and mountains:

moon mountain –

I climb up through all this gorse

into Basho’s Northern Honshu

Gassan (Moon Mountain), Yamagata

Alan Summers

(To be continued)

 

Last of all, I, Hidenori Hiruta, translated Alan Summers’ travelogue into Japanese.

Would you please read my Japanese translation too?

  

新幹線、自販機、そしてセミ

 

(グループ写真/アラン・サマーズ/‘With Wordsの写真)

左から右(立っている方々)

:マツコ・テラオカ、デボラー・ラッセル、アラン・サマーズ、ダニエル・ガリモア、瀧口進、デビ・ベンダー、松尾芭蕉像、ジュディ・ヴィハー、ブルース・ロス

左から右(座っている人たち)

:ブライアン・セルビィ、デヴィッド・バースキィ、ヴィスニヤ・マクマスター

世界俳句祭2002

 

始めに...

9月初め大阪の関西空港に到着、友人である作家仲間のニシダ・マキさんの出迎えを受けた。ニシダさんの両親のお宅に滞在、マキさんの案内で大阪とマキさんの家族が住んでいる神戸の見学に出かけた。私の時差ボケは翌日から二日間過ぎても回復しなかったが、各市で一日18時間も各所の見学に費やした。レストランは申し分なかったが、マキの母ニシダ・アキコが出してくれた料理の情趣、雰囲気そして会食体験のすばらしさにはとても及ばなかった。私が起きている二日間の時間は予定が一杯で、お正月ではなかったけれども須磨寺を訪ねる前に百人一首のゲームを楽しんだ。

秋来ぬにつくつく法師もう鳴けり

ニシダ・マキは須磨寺でセミとセミの鳴き声についてのある武士にまつわる伝説について説明してくれた。そして、その声、セミのコーラスは私には小さな昆虫というよりも一羽の大きな鳥のことを思わせた。9月のこの特別なセミのコーラスは公的に夏の終わりをしばしば連想させられるのである。

それゆえに、つくつく法師(セミの一種ですが、鳴き声からニックネームでそのように呼ばれている)が鳴く時は、他のあらゆる種類のセミの場合と同じように始まりというよりも夏の終わりである。すなわち、他の伝説でも言われているように、それは同時にまだ秋ではないということも意味している。ここは伝説の国であり、その伝説が今も潜在的に残っているかどうかは海外の人たちには決して分からないことである。

マキと彼女の家族との日々は日本での私の他の体験を美しくお膳立てしてくれた。それは、秋田で喜びの中で終わったのである。新幹線、温泉、セミ、自動販売機などなど、少しは今でもここで述べられるけれども、日本のイメージはあまりにも多くありすぎて述べきれないのである。

自販機や奥の細道いずこにも

そして、新幹線の人となる...

新神戸犬形風船その尾振る

他の俳人の方々と会うために鎌倉へ向かう。世界俳句クラブの瀧口進会長の疲れをしらないエネルギーの下で組織された俳句体験に参加するためである。

そして、素晴らしいことに世界俳句クラブの推進顧問のデビ・ベンダーが助力してきました。この冒険の旅を通じて進とデビは両人とも参加者に必要なことの全てに十分な世話が行き届くのを確認するため週7日24時間働き通したように私には思われるのである。

これは本当に芭蕉の足跡のいくつかを辿る大きな旅になりそうであった。そして、不思議な魔法のような温泉の助けで私は英国で起きたひどい足首の腫れから回復できたのであった。

進が根気強く規則的に様々な旅館(和風旅館)にある共同の温泉に入るようにさせてくれたお陰で、私の足首はたちまちの内に腫れがひけてきたのであった。実際、私は丘や山を登り降りできるようなところまで回復したのであった。そうでなかったら、私はただ地面から眺めることができただけだったでしょう。

私は芭蕉を求め探していた。そして、陸奥(みちのく)への旅で、私はここそこにほとんど見受けられないことを感じていた...

東照宮の松静かにあらむ霧と露

鎌倉はこの芭蕉がもたらした冒険の旅と数多くの仲間の俳人たちとの出会いの始まりであった。私はとても光栄なことに有名な俳人でRH・ブライスの友人であるジェームズ・ハケットと、そして、とても素晴らしい俳人である彼の妻パトリシア・ハケットと会いました。私は以前いろいろな句会で二人のことについて知っていたのです。二人は、この旅の途上で会えた最良の仲間でした。私は西洋の俳句界の最も偉大な英雄の一人に出会えた後、今でも身が縮むような思いがします。

鎌倉でドロシイ・ブリトン(レデー・ボーチアー)と会えたことも信じがたいことでした。ドロシー・ブリトンはほんのちょっと前にアメリカ合衆国から着いたばかりで直ちに世界俳句クラブの鎌倉での行事に加わり注目している大聴衆に話をする準備をしました。そして、ジェームズ・W・ハケットによる話を同時通訳してくれました。私は疲労でぐったりしていた一方、彼女はとても新鮮で優雅に見えました。

他に鎌倉でハイライトとなるべきことがいくつかありました。アメリカの画家であり俳句作家のデボラー・ラッセルと素晴らしいユーモアの感覚を分かち合えたことや‘俳句のユーモア’という雑誌の仲間であるカーメン・スターバと会えたことなどもその中に含まれます。

カーメンと私は一時的に世界俳句クラブの皆さんから別れ、クリス・コンドーの家に滞在する機会を得ました。クリスは別名が素晴らしいアラジンの洞穴というアパートに連れて行ってくれた。

翌日私はクリスに別れを告げ(素晴らしいもてなしを受けたことに感謝して)全てにわたってあまりにも、あまりにも素晴らしい、短い滞在であると感じながらカーメンと一緒に東京で開催される次の行事である世界俳句クラブのパーティに間に合うように彼女の元を立ち去ったのであった。

カーメン・スターバと私は一緒に最良の日を過ごし、まさに二人の詩人が東京のあちこちを逍遙し、それから他の詩人たちと合流した芭蕉記念館に向かいました。会いたいと思っている人たちと出会えることは本当に爽やかなことであるが、実際はイー・メールだけで知っていただけでした。

もちろんのことであるが、私は個人的には再び会うことは決してないと思われる非常に多くの俳人の方々と知り合えるように残りの時間を最大限に活用するための努力をしました。

幸運にも私は‘俳句カード’で教えるゲームの発明家であるクロアチアのザグレブのヴィスニャ・マクマスターと同行して期間を共に過ごすことができました。ヴィスニャは全く私欲を持たないでクロアチアの子供たちと一緒に、そして子供たちのために多くのことを成し遂げ、子供たちを日常のある苛酷な周囲の状況から引き離し高めるために俳句がいかに強力な手段になりうるかを証明しました。古いユーゴスラビアの崩壊後の影響から子供たちを引き上げることも含まれていた。

ヴィスニャと一緒に活動したことは私にとって大きなハイライトとなった。彼女と一緒に‘俳句カード’ゲームを楽しみ、秋田の地方の日本の子供たちのいくつかのグループと一緒に活動した。このことは一生忘れることのない一時になりました。

私が会った俳句や連句の世界の草分け的存在でもある他の詩人は、ヨシムラ・イクヨとヤチモト・エイコでした。二人とも偉大な代表的存在で、それぞれ各自芸術の表現形式を持っており、私には目を見張るような存在であった。つまり、まさに名のある婦人と共にいるのだと思いました。

ジェームズ・ハケットと瀧口進の例外は別にして、この二人の女性詩人は女性の流派のカタログの代表であり、私はそのように言い方を修正しなければならないと思います。

それゆえに、この精神の下で、私はオックスフォードから耳を傾けて来た仲間の旅人のことを語らなければならない。彼は私がひどく求めていた芭蕉の精神をにじみ出している詩人でした。この旅人はブライアン・セルビィであった。彼は全ての出席者の中で、純粋な誠実さ、優しさ、寛大さ、寂、そして他の俳諧の持つ特性が混じり合った魅力を自分の周囲にオーラとして持ち合わせているように思われた。このことにより、芭蕉だったら旅の同行者として彼をとても気に入ったことだろうと私は感じたのである。もちろん私はそのような気持ちであった。

悲しいことに、ブライアン・セルビィは私が英国のオックスフォードで再会できる前に逝去しました。しかし、私は彼を忘れることは一度もありません。

世界俳句クラブの日本での体験には最上川下りの旅もあり多くの冒険とごちそうが含まれていた。

秋近し最上川下る米の船

...そして丘、神社と庭園、そして山々を訪問。

月山へ

ハリエニシダの中

登り行く

芭蕉の北の

本州の果て

山形の月山にて。

アラン・サマーズ

(続く)

The next posting “Alan Summers’ Travelogue on World Haiku Festival 2002 in Yuwa”appears on March 6.

Hidenori Hiruta