Professor Kirby Record teaches as director of English for Academic Purposes at Akita International University(AIU)(国際教養大学) in Akita.

He also writes haiku. He is a fellow haiku poet of mine.

 

On October 11 and 12, we participated in AIU Festival and exhibited works of haiku posted on the website, giving haiku activities, such as some haiku quiz.

During the event, Professor Kirby Record joined our activities and contributed his  book of poetry titled “A Welcome Coolness” to me.

 

I post poetry in his book, dividing them into some parts and giving them a Japanese translation, which isn’t sometimes literal. It’s me, Hidenori Hiruta who translated his poetry into Japanese.

The title of his book is derived from the following haiku:

a sudden breeze

in bright winter sunlight, leaves

a welcome coolness

 

冬光に 爽涼迎ふ 風そよぐ

toko ni  soryo mukau  kaze soyogu

 

 

春は花         Haru wa hana

夏ほととぎす             Natsu hototogisu

秋は月                   Aki wa tsuki

冬雪さえて               Fuyu yuki saete

すずしかりけり        Suzushi kari keri

道元禅師 

 

This poetry is Waka (和歌literally “Japanese poem”) written by Dogen Zenji (道元禅師)(1200-1253), a Japanese Zen Buddhist teacher born in Kyoto, and the founder of the Soto school of Zen in Japan.

Professor Kirby Record translated it into English as follows:

To everything there is a season. 

 

Ecclesiastes

 

In Spring, cherry blossoms

In Summer, the cuckoo,

In Autumn, the moon,

In Winter, the snow,

Cold and clear.

 

Dogen Zenji

 

 

Here I post haiku about autumn by Professor Kirby Record.

 

after rain  the ferns in the window  turn gold

 

雨の後 窓辺のシダや 金色に

ame no ato  madobe no shida ya  konjiki ni 

 

 

sleeper car  the clacking of rails  october rain

 

寝台車 レールのカタットといふ音 十月の雨

shindaisha  re-ru no katta to iu oto  jugatsu no ame

 

 

scent  of the rice harvest  at dawn

 

刈り入れの 稲の匂ひや 暁に

kariire no  ine no nioiya   akatsuki ni

 

 

first october frost

just cold enough to feel good

with hands in pockets

 

十月の初霜  ほど良い寒さに  ポケットに手を

jugatsu no hatsushimo  hodo yoi samusa ni  pokketo ni te wo

 

 

japanese maple

 brighter than bright sunlight

all around it

 

イロハモミジ  日光よりも鮮明  周囲悉く

iohamomiji  nikkou yorimo senmei  shui kotogotoku

 

 

autumn moon glowing

   nearly as bright as the sun

sinks into sunset

 

秋の月 夕日のごとく 鮮やかに

aki no tsuki  yuhi no gotoku  azayaka ni

 

 

the autumn colors

on those nearby mountains, blur

into pure whiteness

 

近山の 秋色かすみ 純白に

kinzan no  shushoku kasumi  junpaku ni

 

 

climbing the mountain

how quickly it is passing

forty-sixth autumn

 

山登る 46度目の秋  速し

yama noboru  yonjurokudome no aki  hayashi

 

 

late october rain

on rice fields’ empty stubble:

orange persimmons

 

10月の晩雨 稲田の刈り株 柿オレンジ色

jugatsu no ban u  inada no karikabu  kaki orenji iro

 

 

Next I post some haiku of mine and some photos of autumn.

 

Autumn high skies

Mt. Taihei coloring

purple

 

天高く 紫深し 太平山

ten takaku  murasaki  fukashi  taiheizan

 

 

Snow-capped mountain

leaves coloring

late autumn

 

晩秋や 山 雪帽子 紅葉に

banshu ya  yama yukiboshi  momiji ba ni

 

 

 

Japanese maple

brightening the garden

samurai premise

 

映える庭 イロハモミジの 武家屋敷 

haeru niwa  irohamomiji no  bukeyashiki

 

 

 

The autumn colors

gingko accompanies  

Japanese maple

 

秋色や イロハモミジに イチョウの木 

shushoku ya  irohamomiji ni  icho no ki

 

 

Fallen leaves

into the water

Lake Tazawa

 

秋更ける 田沢の湖に 散る落葉

aki fukeru  Tazawa no umi ni  chiru ochiba

 

 

 

Princess Tatsuko

sees fallen leaves

how many years ?

 

辰子姫 落葉見しより 幾年ぞ 

Tatsukohime  ochiba mishi yori  ikutose zo

 

 

Last of all, I post my favorite haiku of Basho’s, translated into English by Donald Keene.

 

Along this road

There are no travellers

Nightfall in autumn

 

此の道や行人なしに秋の暮 

kono michi ya  yuku hito nashi ni  aki no kure

 

 

Autumn has deepened

I wonder what the man next door

Does for a living ?

 

秋深き隣は何をする人ぞ 

aki fukaki  tonari wa nani wo  suru hito zo

 

― Hidenori Hiruta

 

 

Marshall Hryciuk is a Canadian haiku poet. On November 28th,, 2009, I met him and his wife Karen Sohne, a haiku poet, who has written haiku in English for over 20 years.

It was at a symposium by the Haiku International Association (HIA)(国際俳句交流協会) in Tokyo that we met for the first time. The title of the symposium was Haiku Worldwide – Present and Future. We talked about haiku and made friends with each other at the party.

 

Marshall Hryciuk contributed his haiku book, “Arizona to Crete” to me at the party.

This haiku book looks like his travelogue he wrote during his journey with his wife by car from Arizona to Crete.

The photographs on the front cover, “Monument Valley” and on the back cover, “Off Butterfly Gorge” were both taken and contributed by his wife, Karen Sohne.

 I found that haiku by Marshall Hryciuk are very beautiful and very exciting when I translated them into Japanese.

I’ve divided them into some parts, and I post them on our website to share them with our readers.

Arizona, New Mexico 2004

 

among fallen yucca heads sprouts of new yucca

 

下に落つユッカの頭間新芽生ふ

cliff wind loud in the trees breath tastes of pine cones

 

崖おろし松間に吹きてかさ匂ふ

sheer lookout over junipers

 

the whistle of pines above us

 

糸杉に松のうそぶき渡り行く

wizened foliage but mist between distant mountains

 

葉群はしぼめど遠き山かすむ

air parched

     even when cold

                                     poppies, sulphurs not yellow

 orange

 

空気はからから

寒い時でさえ

                                       芥子、硫黄色、黄色ではなく

オレンジ色

 

vultures

                                                                                 by the roadkill

off to the side

                                                                                               two ravens grooming

 

禿鷲

                                                            路上の死体のそば

脇の離れた所に

オオガラス二羽毛づくろひ

charcoal still charcoal

                  three coats on                    pulling

bones from a salmon

 

濃炭色さらに濃炭色

                     三枚の外皮               引っ張っている

    一匹のサモンから骨を 

vultures circling over the crest

                                    of a pock-marked precipice

 

禿鷲山頂の上空を旋回

                    あばた印の絶壁

animal sniffing my hair

                                          through the tent

                i punch its nose                          twice

 

動物が私の髪の匂ひをくんくん嗅ぐ

                                            テント越しに

                  鼻をげんこつでなぐる          二回

morning after our salmon dinner

raccoon prints cover the Toyota

 

サモンの夕食後の朝

 アライグマの跡がトヨタ車を覆ふ

Last of all I post haiku by Karen Sohne.

the street lamp’s

cone of light     fills

with falling snow

 

街灯の

                                                          光    満たして

雪の降る

(To Be Continued)

  Hidenori Hiruta

 

Professor Kirby Record teaches as director of English for Academic Purposes at Akita International University(AIU)(国際教養大学) in Akita.

He also writes haiku. He is a fellow haiku poet of mine.

 

On October 11 and 12, we participated in AIU Festival and exhibited works of haiku posted on the website, giving haiku activities, such as some haiku quiz.

During the event, Professor Kirby Record joined our activities and contributed his  book of poetry titled “A Welcome Coolness” to me.

 

I post poetry in his book, dividing them into some parts and giving them a Japanese translation, which isn’t sometimes literal. It’s me, Hidenori Hiruta who translated his poetry into Japanese.

The title of his book is derived from the following haiku:

 

a sudden breeze

in bright winter sunlight, leaves

a welcome coolness

 冬光に爽涼迎ふ風そよぐ

toko ni  soryo mukau  kaze soyogu

 

 春は花         Haru wa hana

夏ほととぎす             Natsu hototogisu

秋は月                   Aki wa tsuki

冬雪さえて               Fuyu yuki saete

すずしかりけり        Suzushi kari keri

道元禅師 

This poetry is Waka (和歌literally “Japanese poem”) written by Dogen Zenji (道元禅師)(1200-1253), a Japanese Zen Buddhist teacher born in Kyoto, and the founder of the Soto school of Zen in Japan.

Professor Kirby Record translated it into English as follows:

 

To everything there is a season. 

Ecclesiastes

 

In Spring, cherry blossoms

In Summer, the cuckoo,

In Autumn, the moon,

In Winter, the snow,

Cold and clear.

 

Dogen Zenji

 

Here I post haiku about spring by Professor Kirby Record.

 

 

sunset floating

with a single cherry blossom

over green stones

夕焼けの緑石の上桜花

yuyake no  ryokuseki no ue  sakurabana 

 

 

in the rain

cherry blossoms start

falling faster

 雨の中散り急ぐかな桜花

ameno naka  chiri isogu kana  sakurabana

 

 this first hike of spring

following another’s shadow

resting on my own

初ハイク人の影追ひ我に依る

hatsu haiku  hito no kage oi  ware ni yoru

 

an empty house

only pictures on the wall

spring rain

 春の雨空き家の壁に絵画のみ

haru no ame  akiya no kabe ni  kaiga nomi

 

  sudden gust  opens my front door  into spring

 玄関を風吹き開けて春と化す

genkan wo  kaze fukinukete  haru to kasu

 

 turning  the curve of her waist  in spring light

春光に腰の曲線向き変わる

shunkou ni  koshi no kyokusen  muki kawaru

 

 april rains

allwhite stones of many shades

rushing water

四月の雨影のある白石走る水

shigatsu no ame  kage no aru hakuseki  hasiru mizu

 

back from a walk

the fresh scent of weed

on tattered blue jeans

 散歩から帰る草の新鮮な匂ひボロボロの青いジーンズ

sanpo kara kaeru  kusa no sinsen na nioi  boroboro no aoi jinzu

  

spring rain  futon on tatami  mozart faintly

春の雨畳の上の布団モーツアルト微かに

haru no ame  tatami no ue no futon  motsuaruto  kasukani

 

 Last of all, I post some pictures of cherry blossoms I took this spring, because Professor Kirby Record’s haiku and Dogen Zenji’s waka reminded me of my visit to Kakunodate(角館).

Kakunodate(角館)in Akita flourished as a castle town. The attractive view of the many remaining samurai premises surrounded by black fences and cherry trees gives the town an appearance similar to that of Kyoto and is called “Little Kyoto”.

 

Cherry Trees Along the Hinokinai River Bank

 

The bank of Hinokinai River is designated as a scenic spot of Japan. At the end of April, residents and visitors enjoy viewing the cherry blossoms under the tunnel of cherry blossoms of the Somei Yoshino cherry trees that stretches for two kilometers along the river bank.

 ― Hidenori Hiruta

 

 

The Haiku International Association(HIA)(国際俳句交流協会), a nonprofit organization aimed at promoting haiku globally, celebrated the 20th anniversary of its establishment with a symposium titled Haiku Worldwide ― Present and Future on November 28, Tokyo.

 First of all, HIA President Akito Arima (会長有馬朗人) gave a speech of celebration as a greeting.

 

Secondly, they announced the results of the 11th HIA Haiku contest(HIA俳句大会).

Here we post the names of haiku poets and their haiku selected as prize winners and honorable mentions (Non-Japanese Section). We also post their haiku translated into Japanese.

木村聡雄選  (Selected by Toshio Kimura)

 

特選 (Prize Winners)        

Tatjana Stefanovic (Serbia)       タチアナ ステファノヴィッチ(セルビア)

Gliding to sea               海へと滑る  

towers of sandy castle.          砂の城楼

Long lizard’s tail              長き蜥蜴の尾 

 

Olga Hooper (U.S.A)          オルガ フーバー(アメリカ)

late autumn                ガラス瓶に 

moonlight preserved          閉じこめられた

in a glass jar                晩秋の月明かり

 

入選 (Honorable Mentions)

David Dayson (UK)          ディビッド ディソン(イギリス)

ghosts of distant conflict         遙かな諍い 

still haunt                    亡霊ら未だ彷徨う―

the unarmoured soul           武具つけぬ魂

Roberta Beary (U.S.A)         ロベルタ ベアリー(アメリカ)

(She is a fellow haiku poet of mine)    (私の句友) 

 

new coolness                新涼の

soldiers’ black boots crunch      黒き軍靴が踏み砕く   

leaves of gold                黄金色の落葉

 

Zeljka Vucinic Jambre (Croatia) ジェルカ ヴチニッチ ヤンブレ(クロアチア)

all the reed                 葦すべて

combed in one way           一方向へ梳かれ  

the wind in a marsh           沼風

Petar Tchouhov (Bulgaria)       ペタ チュホヴ(ブルガリア)

full moon                   満月

the hole                   彼の結婚指輪の

of his wedding ring            

 

木内徹選  (Selected by Toru Kiuchi)

 

特選 (Prize Winners)

Tomislav Z. Vujcic (Serbia)       トミスラヴ・ヴィチッチ(セルビア)

Two invalids ―               二人の傷病兵 ― 

me disabled veteran           不具の退役軍人である私と 

and a deer                   鹿  

Owen Bullock (New Zealand)      オウェン・ビュロック(ニュージーランド)

waterfowl                  水辺の鳥が

drift into                   さまよい入っていく  

photos                    写真の中 

 

入選 (Honorable Mentions)

Pamela A. Babusci (U.S.A)       パミーラ・A・バプーシ(アメリカ)   

night of silence               夜のしじま 

I found a river stone            私は河で拾った石を見つけた 

in my pocket                 ポケットのなかに 

Kirsten Cliff  (New Zealand)      カーステン・クリフ(ニュージーランド)

winter afternoon              冬の午後

one empty space               一つの空きが

in the library carpark           図書館の駐車場に

 

Naomi Y. Brown  (U.S.A)        ナオミ・Y・ブラウン(アメリカ)

moonlight ―                         月光― 

Spanish moss hung from tree  サルオガセモドキが木から垂れ下がる 

ghost swaying                         幽霊が揺れる  

 

Tatjana Stefanovic  (Serbia)      タチアナ・ステファノヴィッチ(セルビア)

summer shower:               夏の夕立 ―

Donald Duck’s head peeping        ドナルドダックの頭が覗く 

out of gutter-pipe               排水溝のパイプから

Thirdly, they gave the symposium(シンポジウム), whose panelists were four haiku representatives from the United Kingdom, the U.S., Germany and Croatia, and HIA President Akito Arima.  

They gave a lecture on principles and present circumstances of haiku and discussed and suggested further information for future haiku.

I was deeply impressed with their viewpoints on the meaning and roles of haiku in their daily lives, and also the values of haiku.

I was also impressed with the prediction by HIA President Akito Arima.

He predicted as follows:

Haiku will survive as the shortest form of poetry.

Haiku will have more things to do with nature.

More and more young people will write and read haiku.

More haiku poets will share their haiku on the Internet.

Global haiku meet or exchange will increase on the Internet.

Here we post the panelists and the coordinator and their haiku.

Annie Bachini, President of the British Haiku Society

アニー・バッチーニ(イギリス俳句協会長)

sliding on and off       つかず離れず滑りゆく 

the river’s edge        川のへりを 

autumn leaves         秋の葉が 

Lenard Moore, president of the Haiku Society of America

レナード・ムーア(アメリカ俳句協会会長)

autumn sunset        秋の夕陽

helicopter rises        ヘリコプターが上がる

from the heliport       ヘリポートから

Marijan Cekoji, president of the Croatian Haiku Society

マリアン・チェコリ(クロアチア俳句協会会長)

here, behind the Crown            ここ、木のてっぺんの後ろに

of a tree the sun going down     夕陽が沈む

to the next side of the world      この世界の向こう側へ

Stephan Wolfschutz, president of the German Haiku Society

シュテファン・ヴォルフシュッツ(ドイツ俳句協会会長)

the pebbles             小石が

under my feet          私の足下に

Buddha’s birthday       仏陀の誕生日

HIA President Akito Arima

有馬朗人(国際俳句交流協会会長)

looking for

something lost ―       失ひしものを探しに冬帽子

wearing a winter cap

 

Tsunehiko Hoshino, HIA vice-president as coordinator

星野恒彦(国際俳句交流協会副会長)司会

Walking a little apart     

from its shadow ―      影すこし離して行くや朝の蟻

early morning ant

 

Last of all, we post the party(懇親会) held in order for participants to talk about haiku with each other, share and exchange haiku and ideas, and deepen friendship.

Many speeches were made and haiku were presented on the stage too.

Honorary President of Modern Haiku Association, Tota Kaneko(現代俳句協会名誉会長 金子兜太), gave a speech of congratulations.

 

The Fruit grove

is the isolated island of mine,   果樹園がシャツ一枚の俺の孤島

wearing only a shirt

 

What impressed me most was that Marshall Hryciuk, a Canadian haiku poet, demonstrated haiku by sign language on the stage.

I made friends with him and Karen Sohne, a Canadian haiku poet.

  

They presented haiku book and haiku publications to me, and I also presented our yearly pamphlet on ‘Akita International Haiku Network’  to them in return.

In the haiku book titled ‘Arizona to Crete’, I found that Marshall Hryciuk won first prize at Eighth HIA Haiku Contest, Non-Japanese Section, Tokyo 2006.

Marshall Hryciuk (Canada)        マーシャル・リシック(カナダ)

in darkness              闇のなか

i await                    我が声を 

my voice                 待つ

 

Karen Sohne recited her haiku to me.  

 カレン・ソーニー(カナダ)

steps cut into stone        階段の

in each corner           石の隅ごと

petals                  花びらよ

We parted, saying ‘Good Luck!’. 

And we promised that we would exchange and share haiku by e-mail and on the website.

                         By  Hidenori Hiruta

                         HIA member