The Results of the 18th HIA Haiku Contest

 

The Award ceremony for the 18th HIA Haiku Contest was held at “Ichigaya Arcadia” Sunday, 4th December 2016, at 10:30 a.m.

The winning works were announced and Ms. Nguyen Vu Quynh NHU, who is Visiting Research Scholar, International Research Center for Japanese Studies, gave an honorable lecture on the theme “Haiku in Vietnam” in Japanese.

The 18th HIA Haiku Contest

Sponsored by Haiku International Association
Supported by Nihon Keizai Shimbun, The Japan Times

Here are the names of haiku poets and their haiku selected as prize winners and honorable mentions (Non-Japanese Section). Here are also their haiku translated into Japanese by two judges, Mr. Toru Kiuchi and Mr. Toshio Kimura.

 

木内徹選  (Selected by Toru Kiuchi)

 

特選 (Prize Winners)        

 

Laura Nicola (Denmark)    ローラ・ニコラ(デンマーク)

 

Empty street                  人のいない通り 

Birds flying away             鳥が飛び去る

First golden leaf          最初の金色の葉っぱ

 

 

Andrius Luneckas (Lithuania)   アンドリウス・ルネカス(リトアニア)

 

sunflowers field           ひまわりの畑

son asks about              息子が尋ねる

universe               宇宙のことを

 

 

入選 (Honorable Mentions)

 

Anthony Obaro (NIGERIA)    アントニー・オバロ(スイス)

 

noon darkness            昼の暗闇

watery bullet s pound           雨のように銃弾は跳ねる

every roof             どの屋根の上にも

 

 

Angela Cornelia Voss (Germany) アンジェラ・コーネリア・ヴォス(ドイツ)

 

On a park bench            公園のベンチで

I have nothing for you          私はあなたたちに何もあげるものがない  

two sparrows              二羽の雀に

 

 

Pere Risteski (Macedonia)     ベレ・リステスキー(マケドニア)

 

from the rooftops           家々の

of the houses, smoke lifts        屋根の上から、煙が上がる 

light as a breath            吐息のように軽々と

 

 

Anna Switalska-Jopek (Gdansk)              アナ・スウィタルスカ=ジョベク

                                                                                                                         (ポーランド)

 

winter evening             冬の夜

on my tambour frame          私の刺繍枠のうえに

a meadow’s blooming          草原の花が咲く

 

 

木村聡雄選  (Selected by Toshio Kimura)

 

特選 (Prize Winners)

 

Dorota Pyra  (Poland)       ドロータ・ピーラ (ポーランド)

 

cranes in flight              鶴飛ぶや

my father’s worn coat           父の古外套

full of autumn wind            秋風満つ 

 

 

Roberta Beary (U.S.A.)        ロバータ・ベアリー(アメリカ)

 

deep in the cat’s eyes           猫の眼の深く

the crow’s caw caw caw           カラスのカァ・カァ・カァ 

 

 

入選 (Honorable Mentions)

 

Lilia Racheva (Bulgaria)      リリア・ラチェーヴァ(ブルガリア)   

 

traces in the garden            庭の足跡

jasmine                    ジャスミンに

rediscovering me             我ふたたび

 

 

Kwaku Feni Adow (Ghana)    クヮク・フェニ・アドゥ(ガーナ)

 

arriving on the farm –                                            農場に着くなり

the open arms               両手を広げて

of the scarecrow              案山子

 

 

mayflowerbg (Maya Lyubenova)(Bulgaria) メイフラワーbg(ブルガリア)

 

minor seventh…              マイナーセブンス和音

a car door squeaks                       ツグミの歌に  

to the blackbird’s song                                  車のドア鳴く  

 

 

Kjmunro (Katherine Munro) (Canada) kjマンロゥ(カナダ)

 

dark night                 闇夜

every raindrop a star              雨一粒一粒星の

falling                   降る

 

 

                         By Hidenori Hiruta

  (HIA member)

 

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The Results of the 17th HIA Haiku Contest

 

The Award ceremony for the 17th HIA Haiku Contest was held at “Ichigaya Arcadia” , Tokyo, Saturday, 5th December 2015, at 10:30 a.m.

The winning works were announced and H.E. Dr. Radu Șerban, Romanian Ambassador to Japan, who is a haikuist, gave an honorable lecture on haiku in English.

 

The 17th HIA Haiku Contest

 

Sponsored by Haiku International Association
Supported by Nihon Keizai Shimbun, The Japan Times

Here are the names of haiku poets and their haiku selected as prize winners and honorable mentions (Non-Japanese Section). Here are also their haiku translated into Japanese by two judges, Mr. Toru Kiuchi and Mr. Toshio Kimura.

 

 

木内徹選  (Selected by Toru Kiuchi)

 

特選 (Prize Winners)        

 

Owen Bullock (Australia)        オウエン・ビュロック(オーストラリア)

 

black swan                        黒い白鳥 

water drops                  水滴が

jewel the neck              首飾りに

 

 

Ernest j berry (New Zealand)      アーネスト・j・ベリー(ニュージーランド)

 

dying oak                枯れゆく樫の木が

by the curator’s home           図書館長の家の横で

limbs akimbo               両枝を腰に当てた恰好に

 

 

入選 (Honorable Mentions)

 

Valeria Barouch (Switzerland)      ヴァレリア・バルーシュ(スイス)

 

Botanical garden            植物園

the café’s empty chairs            そこのカフェに誰も座らない椅子

sparrow perches             雀がとまっている

 

 

Kanchan Chatterjee (India)       カンチャン・チャタジー(インド)

 

long rains…                  長雨-

the night guard’s faint whistle         夜警のかすかな笛の音が  

floats by                 漂い聞こえる

 

 

Nshai Waluzimba (Zambia)        ンシャイ・ワルジンバ(ザンビア)

 

a committee               会合が

gathers in celebration -           祝福のために召集される- 

dying buffalo                 水牛が息絶える

 

 

Sasa Vazic (Serbia.)                                     ササ・ヴァジッチ(セルビア)

 

back to my village…            村に戻る-

more furrows twisted around        また畝が荒らされている

the chestnut’s bark             栗の木の皮が落ちている 

 

 

木村聡雄選  (Selected by Toshio Kimura)

 

特選 (Prize Winners)

 

RaV  (Poland)             ラヴィー (ポーランド)

 

cherry blossom rain              花の雨

just a few heartbeats            鼓動いくつか

from the ground                地面より 

 

 

Adam Augustin (Poland)         アダマ・アウギュスティン(ポーランド)

 

old clock                  古時計

run by finger                 指で回して 

stopped time              時を止める

 

 

入選 (Honorable Mentions)

 

Steven Clarkson (New Zealand)    スティーヴン・クラークソン(ニュージーランド)   

 

a handful                 ひとにぎり

would suffice               ただそれだけで

mountain stars              山の星

 

 

Roberta BEARY  (U.S.A.)       ロバータ・ビアリー(アメリカ)

 

express train                 急行列車

3 seconds                 三秒間の

of sunflowers                ひまわりを

 

 

Valeria Barouch (Switzerland)      ヴァレリア・バルーフ(スイス)

 

Riverbank                川の土手

only clover leaves                  クローバーばかり  

without luck                                     つきも無し  

 

 

Alexey Andreev (Russia)        アレクシー・アンドレーヴ(ロシア)

 

power restored              停電復旧

yet I don’t rush              すぐには蝋燭

to blow out the candle           吹き消さず

 

 

Congratulations to winners!

I am greatly delighted to find haiku by some haiku friends of mine, Ernest J Berry (New Zealand), Kanchan Chatterjee (India), Sasa Vazic (Serbia.), Roberta BEARY  (U.S.A.), and Alexey Andreev (Russia).

Congratulations again!  

                         By Hidenori Hiruta

  (HIA member)

 

 

 

 

 

On December 20, 2011, Patricia Lidia in Romania, kindly presented a haiku calendar to us.

The haiku calendar was made by Ioana Dinescu and Constanta Erca in Romania.

Here is a photo of the month June.

 

 

 

firefighter garden –

an old man calmly sprinkles

the dahlia’s red                                       Edward Tara

 

消防士の庭 ―

一人の老人が静かに散水する

ダリアの赤に                エドワード・タラ

 

Today is June 2. Five months have passed after we welcomed the new year 2012.  Haiku friends of mine have enjoyed their haiku life in their own ways.

On May 10, Ms. Roberta Beary in USA sent me an e-mail as follows.

Hello sensei!

I wanted to share my honorable mention haibun with you for this year’s Genjuan International Haibun Contest. 

I have also attached a picture of the red silk obi of the last haiku in the haibun (my dog, Winnie is in the picture too!)
Here you go:

Timeline

When my husband and I arrive in Japan we promise each other it will be for three years. Three years turn into five. And for one of us, five years turn into forever.

cherry blossoms —
dusk slips in
uninvited

Back in the United States, I cannot forget Japan and what I left behind. Now I am a single mother with two small children. How will I raise them on my own?

winding road
face of a rabbit
in the moon

In my struggle I recall a word I often heard in Japan. Gambatte. A word that is hard to translate. Some explain it as ‘be strong’. Others as ‘do your best’. To me Gambatte means ‘keep going’. Over and over I say it. Gambatte becomes my mantra. I keep going. Little by little pieces of my old life mingle with the new. My children’s names in katakana on a scroll above their beds. I eavesdrop as they read side-by-side in tiny rocking chairs. First one story Momotaro the Peach Boy, then the other Kaguya-Hime the Moon Princess.

sunlight
on the welcome mat
a pair of slippers

Time keeps its own counsel. Children grow up and move away. But always, with a sweet nostalgia, I remember Japan.

red silk obi
how gently it drapes
the old piano

Credit: Honorable Mention 2012 Genjuan International Haibun Contest

 

 

 

Here is another picture of the red silk obi.

 

Last of all, I would like to introduce Roberta Beary to you.
Roberta is a haiku friend of Alan Summers’ and mine.

She says in her e-mail as follows.

Hi Hidenori
Thank you for including haiku from my book, ‘nothing left to say’ at the Int’l Haiku Spring Festival in partnership with the 2010 Bath Japanese Festival. I got to meet Alan Summers last September when I traveled to London. He is an amazing person!!

https://akitahaiku.wordpress.com/2010/05/12

Here is the short introduction: Roberta Beary was born and raised in New York City. In 1990 she moved to Japan for five years of haiku study. Her individual poems, an unconventional hybrid of haiku and senryu, have been honored throughout North America, Europe and Asia for their innovative style. Her book of haiku and senryu, The Unworn Necklace (Snapshot Press, 2007), selected as a William Carlos Williams Book Award finalist (Poetry Society of America), was named a Haiku Society of America Merit Book Award prize winner. She also co-edited two Haiku Society of America anthologies both of which were named Merit Book Award winners. Her most recent work, a chapbook titled ‘nothing left to say’(edited by Michael Dylan Welch) is the 20th title in the Hexagram Series of master haiku poets.

Wishing you all the best,
Roberta

www.robertabeary.com

Here is a photo of me taken in December 2005 at the Kumamoto Hotel in Japan. I was in Kumamoto to receive the Grand Prize in the Kusumakura International Haiku Contest (「草枕」国際俳句大会). The prize included a trip to Japan! My winning haiku: thunder/the roses shift/into shadow

 

 

 

Here is the photo of me which appears on my book of haiku, The Unworn Necklace, winner of the Poetry Society of America Finalist Award. A hardcover edition will be published this year by Snapshot Press, UK.

 

 

 

Now I present the first haiku from her book ‘nothing left to say’.

 

nothing left to say

an empty nest

fills with snow

 

言うことは何も残されていない

一つの空の巣

雪で一杯である

 

The next posting ‘「草枕」国際俳句大会 (1)’ appears on June 9.

 

― Hidenori Hiruta

 

 

The New Year’s Festival has started with the arrival of Gabi Greve’s rabbit.

Gabi’s rabbit came to Akita from Okayama on New Year’s Eve, participating in the festival.

 

 

 

Gabi says in her haiku:

 

New Year preparations –
my rabbit in his coat
      我が兎正月用にお召かえ
of white

 

 

Patricia Lidia’s rabbit has got to the festival from Romania, carrying new resolutions.

 

 

 

Fay Aoyagi’s rabbit has also arrived here from the Moon Palace by ship. 

 

In addition, haiku, tanka, senryu and photos have been presented to the festival from the poets worldwide.

 

 

 

Fay Aoyagi (USA)                                      青柳飛 (アメリカ)

 

New Year’s Day

a rabbit arrives in the ship      元旦や月の宮より兎来る 

from the Moon Palace

 

 

New Year’s Day mirror

learning how to smile          初鏡大黒様に笑み習ふ 

from a potbelly Buddha

 

 

 

Shoichiro Arakawa (Japan)                 荒川祥一郎(日本)(川柳作家)

 

The first sunrise

of Mt. Fuji beaming           地デジからドカンと富士の初日の出

through the digital TV

 

 

New Year’s resolution  

Don’t be afraid of              新年へ期するものあり縄梯子 

any rope ladder 

 

 

 

Nana Fredua Agyeman           ナナ ・フレドュア ・アゲマン

 (Ghana)                                  (ガーナ)

 

 

 

rising sun –

the spider’s web catches       初日の出蜘蛛の巣虹をとらえけり

rainbow

 

 

coming in from the cold…

a trail of ants lines           寒さ避け壁に一本蟻の道

the wall

 

 

 

Wahyu W. Basjir (Indonesia)    ワヒュウ ・W.バスジア(インドネシア)

 

 

 

year end

would it be a break          年末は小康であれ胃炎かな

enduring gastritis

 

 

lie to me

this year won’t end        月は出ず年は明けずとウソ言いな

moonless

 

 

 

Roberta Beary (USA)         ロバータ ・ベアリー (アメリカ) 

 

new year’s day        元日 
the smile she saves
    彼女のとっておきの微笑み
just for him
         ただただ彼のために

 
 
 

 

 

 

Brian Birdsell (USA)       ブライアン ・バードセル (アメリカ)

 

in the evening
a field of angels
        雪の夕天使の野原残されり
left in the snow
 
 
january 1st
waiting in the pines –
      元日や松飾りの中ソバを待つ 
the taste of soba
 
 
my daughter
holds an icicle –
         我が娘つららを持ちて年を取る

one more year slips by
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

ZLATA BOGOVIĆ (CROATIA)  ズラータ ・ボゴビス (クロアチア)

 

New Year’s Eve – 

too short is this night for      大晦日抱負のいまだ実らずに

all my resolutions 

  

 

Popping corks –             コルク栓がポンと鳴る 

the New Year descended       新年が明けてきた  

the fireworks               花火があがる 

 

 

 

Helen Buckingham (UK)        ヘレン ・バッキンガム (イギリス)

  

 New Year’s Day–

woken by the number       元日や手の甲の数字で目が覚める 

on the back of my hand

 (Presence, January 2010)        (2010年1月の作品) 

 

 the century enters its pre-teens   世紀がプリティーンに入る 

…Earth looks pale          ...地球は淡い

and interesting               そしておもしろい

 (unpublished)                     (未発表)  

 

 

  

Seisaku Chiba (Japan)                      千葉星作  (日本)

 

sitting straight                      

foreign students              留学生端座よろしき冬の舞

dance in winter

 

 

a black bullet

Ponta my late cat             亡きポンタ黒き弾丸雪の舞

in the snow

 

 

Gillena Cox                    ギリナ ・コックス
(Trinidad and Tobago)            (トリニダード・トバゴ)

the morning’s azure
a coolness against my cheek
    元旦や蒼穹の冷我が頬に 
new year’s day

 

January first
the crumble
               
元日や古いカレンダー粉々に 
of last year’s calendar
 
 
 

  

 

 

Janjalija Damir              ジャンジャリジャ ・ダミア

(Montenegro)                  (モンテネグロ)

 

The muddy road
slowly covering in snow
      大晦日泥んこの道雪の中 

New Year’s Eve
 
 
 
The landscape impressed
in the whiteness of paper
     初日の出白い紙面に風景が 

First sunrise

 

 

 

Tatjana Debeljacki Serbia)    タトジャナ ・デベルジャッキ (セルビア)

 

Aroma of the fir tree            モミの木の芳香

through the woods and fields       森と野を通って     

white covering cloth             覆う白い布

 

 

Lightening balls               照らされているボール

are twinkling the magic      マジックをきらきら輝かしている

imagination of child            子供の想像力

 

 

The cabin in the bay           湾の中の船室 

New Year’s Eve waltzing         大晦日のワルツ

of two travelers               二人の旅人の

 

 

 

The next posting ‘International Haiku New Year’s Festival 2011 (Part 2)’ appears on January 2.

 

― Hidenori  Hiruta

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Akito Arima 有馬朗人is President of the Haiku International Association (HIA)国際俳句交流協会(http://www.haiku-hia.com), a nonprofit organization aimed at promoting haiku globally.

Dr. Arima also leads the haiku group Ten’I (Providence)天為(http://haikunet.info).

 

 

 

On December 2, I received HAIKU INTERNATIONAL NO.91 published on November 30, 2010.

In the magazine they reported the results of the 12th HIA Haiku contestHIA俳句大会, which was such a nice surprise to me.

That was because I found haiku by two friends of mine in the report.

One haikuist is Chen-ou Liu, who kindly contributed his haiku and tanka to our network.

Chen-ou Liu’s haiku was posted in the website on September 25, and tanka, on October 30.

The other haikuist is Roberta Beary, who kindly contributed her haiku for Int’l Haiku Spring Festival 2010 held by the Akita International Haiku Network with our sister festival 2010 Bath Japanese Festival.

I posted some of Roberta’s haiku from her book nothing left to say  for the festival in the website on May 12.

I would like to express my hearty congratulations on such nice creations of haiku by Chen-ou Liu and Roberta Beary.    

 

Here I post the names of haiku poets and their haiku selected as prize winners and honorable mentions (Non-Japanese Section). I also post their haiku translated into Japanese.

 

 

木内徹選  (Selected by Toru Kiuchi)

 

 

特選 (Prize Winners)        

 

 

Chen-ou Liu (Canada)          チェン・ウー・リュー(カナダ)

 

autumn dusk・・・           秋の夕暮れ・・・ 

I stir my coffee            コーヒーをかき回す

anticlockwise             時計と反対で回りで

 

 

Kevin O’Donnel (New Zealand)       ケヴィン・オドネル(ンユージーランド)

 

the winter sun                冬の日が

stretches your shadow          あなたの影を伸ばす

as far as a seagull’s call       カモメの呼び声と同じくらい遠くへ

 

 

入選 (Honorable Mentions)

 

 

Dubravko Korbus (Croatia)        ドゥブラウコ・コルブス(クロアチア)

 

the first snowflakes           初雪が

hold down a bowed back of       こごんだ背中をさらに押しつける

the scarecrow                    かかしの

 

 

Darrel Lindsey (U.S.A)          ダレル・リンゼイ(アメリカ)

 

outside the asylum           収容所施設の外で

the vertigo                     眩暈が  

of flowers                     花の

 

 

Lyle Rumpel (Canada)          ライル・ランベル(カナダ)

 

night owl                   夜のフクロウ

the forest grows             森がふくらむ 

between calls                鳴き声のあいだに

 

 

Roberta Beary (U.S.A.)             ロバータ・ベアリー(アメリカ)

 

cherry blossoms             桜の花

the incessant sound           止めどなく

of mother’s cough             母が咳き込む 

 

 

木村聡雄選  (Selected by Toshio Kimura)

 

 

特選 (Prize Winners)

 

Urszula  Wielanowska (Poland)     ウルスラ・ウイラノブスカ(ポーランド)

 

gondola                            ゴンドラ

emerges from the mist           霞より現れて

the end of the canto            歌の終り 

 

 

Florentina Loredana Dalian (Romania) フロレンティナL・ダリアン(ルーマニア)

 

Leaving behind              あとには

a sad lotus in bloom         悲しげな蓮の花 

an alone rower              ひとり漕ぐ

 

 

入選 (Honorable Mentions)

 

M Fazio (Australia)           M・ファチィオ(オーストラリア)   

 

the town clock                   町の時計

chimes three-regretting        私三時を打てば―悔いる

my words                       我が言葉

 

 

Valeria Simonova-Cec (Italy)      ヴァレリア・シモノヴァチェク(イタリー)

 

cold marble                   ひんやりと大理石

on St. John’s lips            聖ヨハネの唇に

the unspoken word           語られないままの言葉

 

 

Robert Naczas  (Ireland)        ロバート・ナクザス(アイルランド)

                                                  

idle morning ―                けだるい朝

passing magpie                 よぎるカササギ

steals my thought                   我が想いをかすめ  

 

 

Malcolm Creese (UK)           マルコム・クリース(イギリス)

 

With only two notes                  たった二言で

the cuckoo says more than the      カッコウは

blackbird ever can                    ツグミより多くの歌を

 

 

Last of all, I refer to what HIA President Akito Arima concluded in the international symposium titled Haiku Worldwide – Present and Future.

The symposium was given for the celebration of the 20th anniversary of HIA on November 28, 2009 in Tokyo.

As panelists, they had Annie Bachini, President of the British Haiku Society, Lenard Moore, president of the Haiku Society of America, Marijan Cekoji, president of the Croatian Haiku Society, Stephan Wolfschutz, president of the German Haiku Society, and Dr. Akito Arima.

Tsunehiko Hoshino, HIA vice-president played a role of coordinator.

 

 

 

Dr. Arima predicted as follows:

Haiku will spread out to the world more because of its brevity and its coexistence with nature.

At present, some young people in Japan write the short poems of three lines: haiku.

As a result, people overseas will have more chances to read English haiku written by native speakers of Japanese.

The international haiku contests could be held on the Internet worldwide in 20 or 30 years. This might be possible because haiku is written in the shortest form of poetry.

 

We sincerely hope that haiku will be loved in English as well as in their own languages.

 

                         By  Hidenori Hiruta

                         HIA member

 

 

On May 18,2010, I received a comment on haiku by Roberta Beary for Int’l Haiku Spring Festival from Michael Dylan Welch as follows:

 

Nice to see these translations of Roberta’s poems from the book!

Michael 

 

Since then we have been exchanging e-mails.

 

First of all, I would like to introduce Michael to you.

 

Michael Dylan Welch has written haiku since 1976. He’s a longtime vice president of the Haiku Society of America, cofounded Haiku North America in 1991 and the American Haiku Archives in 1996, and founded the Tanka Society of America in 2000. He is editor/publisher of Tundra: The Journal of the Short Poem (since 1997) and of Press Here haiku and tanka books (since 1989). He previously edited Woodnotes (1989–1997). Michael’s haiku and longer poems have appeared in hundreds of journals and anthologies in fourteen languages, and he’s won first prize in the Henderson, Brady, Drevniok, and Tokutomi contests. These invited poems focus on plants and trees of the Pacific Northwest.

Individual poems first published in various haiku journals. Two of these poems (“after-dinner mints” and “bookmobile day”) were also stamped onto paper grocery bags distributed at selected Seattle grocery stores, and also part of Bob Redmond’s SLUG Food Haiku Reading that I participated in at Seattle’s Jewelbox Theatre on 24 August 2009, and also appeared in a handmade anthology of poems from this poetry event. See photos and the Seattle Times article about this reading.

 

 Now I present you Food Haiku by Michael with my Japanese translations. You will find his haiku in his website ‘GRACEGUTS’ at https://sites.google.com/site/graceguts/haiku-and-senryu/food-haiku.

 

birthday picnic— 

grandma’s throw 

half way to the toddler 

 

誕生日のピクニックで:

 

おばあちゃんよちよちの孫と投げごっこ

 

 

we walk the boardwalk hand in hand 

                sharing ice cream 

   headaches 

 

手を取り合って歩く遊歩道で:

 

遊歩道アイス分け合う頭痛かな

 

 

after-dinner mints 

passed around the table 

. . . slow-falling snow 

 

 夕食後の食卓で:

 

降る雪やハッカキャンデー卓まわる

 

 

busy Italian restaurant— 

happy birthday 

sung to the wrong table 

 

賑やかなイタリアレストランで:

 

斉唱やハッピーバースデー違う卓

 

express checkout 

     the fat woman counts

           the thin man’s items

 

清算所で:

 

勘定や太った女痩身に

 

 

at his favourite deli 

the bald man finds a hair 

in his soup 

 

お気に入りの調理済み食品店で:

 

禿げた人髪見つけたるスープかな

 

 

rice chaff 

whitens the scoop— 

supper alone 

 

孤食さじお米に白し夕べかな

 

 

apples picked 

and the casket chosen— 

lingering sunset 

 

りんご摘み小箱を選ぶ夕日まだ 

 

 

grocery shopping— 

pushing my car faster 

through feminine protection 

 

食料雑貨店で買い物:

 

はやばやとカートを押すや女性の区

 

 

a crab apple 

from the highest branch 

rattles down the rain spout 

 

雨どいを野生りんごが高きより

 

 

the waiter interrupts 

our argument on abortion— 

a choice of teas 

 

ウエイター中絶の論茶に変える

 

 

first day of school— 

I eat my buckwheat pancakes 

in silence 

 

初出校黙々食べるパンケーキ

 

 

bookmobile day— 

huckleberries bloom 

along the white picket fence 

 

図書館やハックルベリーの花のそば

 

 

breakfast alone 

slowly I eat 

my melancholy 

 

憂愁や朝食一人時が経つ

 

 

a table for one— 

   leaves rustle 

in the inner courtyard 

 

卓一人中庭に聞く残り音

 

 

 

a deer leaps— 

the hunter’s 

         closed eye 

 

 

跳ぶ鹿やハンター一つ目を閉じる

 

 

tarnished silver 

        the only guest 

               eats in silence 

 

銀曇るお客が一人無言食

 

 

a withered apple 

caught in an old spine rake 

. . . blossoms fall 

 

古レーキしぼむりんごや花が散る

 

 

gunshot recordings

echo over the vineyard . . .

a grackle’s stained beak

 

ブドウ園で発砲の録音声が反響する:

 

ムクドリのくちばしの色ブドウかな

 

a broken bamboo cane—

         ripe tomatoes

         glow along the ground

 

竹添え木折れて地面の熟れトマト

 

cafeteria line—

the good-looking girl

looks at my plate

 

カフェテリア列の美人が皿を見る

 

I sincerely hope that you will appreciate food haiku by Michael, and that you will try to write food haiku too.  

The next posting ‘ Haiku by Angelika Bygott in Canada’ appears on August 21.

Hidenori  Hiruta

 

On May 18,2010, I received a comment on haiku by Roberta Beary for Int’l Haiku Spring Festival from Michael Dylan Welch as follows.

 

Nice to see these translations of Roberta’s poems from the book!

Michael

 

 

Since then we have been exchanging e-mails.

  

First of all, I would like to introduce Michael to you.

 

Michael Dylan Welch is passionate about poetry, especially haiku, which he has been writing since 1976 and teaching since about 1990. He has won first place in numerous poetry contests, and has had his haiku, senryu, tanka, and longer poetry published in more than a dozen languages in hundreds of journals and anthologies, including two Norton anthologies. He edited the quarterly haiku journal

Now I post his essay ‘Haiku and the Japanese Garden’ with my translations.

When I told him to take it up in our website, he sent me an e-mail on June 9, saying as follows.

Thank you — I would love to have you present that essay and your translations. You might also be interested to know that I recorded that essay on audio, with koto and shakuhachi music by Elizabeth and John Falconer, for the Seattle Japanese Garden audio tour. The track is available for online listening or download. If you go to http://www.seattle.gov/parks/parkspaces/japanesegarden.htm and scroll down to Audio Tour, there are links there to iTunes and RSS. Click either one to get a list of all the audio tracks. My recording of “Haiku and the Japanese Garden” is the second-last track (track 11). If your site also linked to this, that would be great. You can also click the “Audio Tour Liner Notes” link to get a description of all the tracks and the credits for the recordings. Thank you again!

And do let me know if I can answer any questions you might have as you do your translations.

Michael

Haiku and the Japanese Garden First published on the Haiku Garden Poetry Readings site in 2004, and also recorded for the Seattle Japanese Garden audio tour in 2009.There’s something poetic about a garden. Sometimes any garden will do, but a Japanese garden seems especially poetic. As you walk around such a garden in the flow of the year’s season’s, you may notice a fallen camellia blossom, a blade of grass set to swaying by a passing dragonfly, a drying oak leaf clinging to a mushroom, or frost sparkling on a bright red berry. These details inspire poetry the world over. In Japan, they often inspire a special genre of poetry known as haiku.  

               mountain morning— 

              all over the red berry bush 

              snow in tiny heaps 

Haiku seeks to capture these details, these brief moments of keen perception and intuition, recording them so that the poet and reader—or listener—might share and celebrate their universal authenticity.

              clicking off the late movie . . . 

              the couch cushion 

              reinflates 

 

Haiku is a poetry of nature, but it is also a poetry of human nature. Haiku gives readers feelings, and shows human existence amid nature. Not all haiku are about beauty, but they are always about what is real. We have an emotional reaction to the poem’s image, sense perception, and seasonal reference. On reading a good haiku, we are mentally and emotionally moved to experience what the poet experienced, yet we do so without being told what to feel. We simply see it, touch it, taste it, hear it, and smell it through the words—and thus feel it. We leap into intuitively feeling and understanding what the poet deliberately left out of the poem so we could figure it out for ourselves. This is the magic of haiku, and the Japanese garden is an ideal place to make the most of this magic.

             winter wind— 

             kite string tangled 

             in the garden trellis

At a Japanese garden, you can walk around and notice the ponds, the bushes, the flowers, the fish, the birds. Or you can learn their names, notice their details, notice their seasonal changes. Bashō, the great Japanese haiku master, said to “learn of the pine tree from the pine tree, and of the bamboo from the bamboo.” He meant to ground yourself in the authentic, to be in the present, and to see the thing itself deeply and freshly, rather than your interpretation of the thing, and not to be distracted by what is going on other than where you are and what you are doing at the present moment. By writing haiku about what you sense in the garden, you can make the garden a more vibrant place, and by learning haiku that others have written and sharing them with others in the garden, you can also enrich the experience.

             tulip festival— 

             the colours of all the cars 

             in the parking lot

So what is haiku? It is a brief poem capturing a moment of deep perception of nature or human nature, using the techniques of pause or juxtaposition (kire in Japanese) and seasonal reference (kigo). The juxtaposition of two parts of the poem creates tension that the reader can resolve by figuring out their relationship. A seasonal reference grounds the poem not only in very real and present time but in the grand sweep of each season’s metaphorical associations, as well as to other poems that use the same seasonal foundation. You can compose haiku well by writing about things themselves rather than your reactions to those things.

              an old woolen sweater 

             taken yarn by yarn

             from the snowbank

 

Haiku is often misunderstood as a “form” of poetry, being merely anything that can be written in a pattern of 5-7-5 syllables in three lines. That pattern applies to traditional haiku in Japanese (although they count sounds, not strictly syllables), and is not used by the great majority of dedicated haiku poets writing in English. Also, the genre is too often tarnished by “joke” haiku that claim the name of haiku but nearly none of its highly developed aesthetics. Though haiku in English has been mistaught in schools as a “5-7-5-syllable” poem, such a focus on form, and an incorrect form for English at that, minimizes the much more significant characteristics of the two-part juxtapositional structure and the seasonal reference.

              morning chill—

             the bag of marbles

             shifts on the shelf

 

Haiku are typically rooted in objective description (avoiding metaphor, simile, and other rhetorical or subjective devices, including judgment and analysis), and always try to leave something out (often the feeling one experiences) so that it might be implied. It is thus much harder to write than its deliberately simple language would imply. As French philosopher Roland Barthes once observed, “haiku has this rather fantasmagorical property: that we always suppose we ourselves can write such things easily.”

              home for Christmas:

             my childhood desk drawer

             empty

In English, haiku objectively suggests a moment of here-and-now realization (an “aha” moment) about nature or human nature, or human nature in the context of nature, usually presented in three lines using no set syllable pattern. Haiku typically avoid using a title, rhyme, or other devices that call attention to the words themselves (or to the poet’s cleverness) rather than what the words signify. American haiku pioneer James W. Hackett gave good advice on this topic: “A haiku,” he said, “is like a finger pointing at the moon, and if the finger is bejeweled, one no longer sees the moon.” Indeed, haiku are not meant to be obscure or private, and should, as Jack Kerouac once wrote, be as simple as porridge.

              warm winter evening—

             the chairs askew

             after the poetry reading

 

Not only can a Japanese garden inspire poetry, but so can the rest of the world. Haiku is a means of sense awareness, of mindfulness, a poetic window to the suchness of the full range of existence. You can take haiku sensibilities cultivated in the Japanese garden and apply them to the rest of the everyday world, making the ordinary extraordinary as you write haiku and see the world with wider eyes.

 

 

和訳

俳句と日本庭園

最初2004年「俳句庭園詩歌リーディング」サイトで発表され、2009年には「シアトル日本庭園」オーディオ・ツアー用にも録音された。

庭園には何か詩的なものがある。どんな庭でも時々このような面があるが、日本の庭園は特に詩的なように見える。一年の季節の移ろいを見せるそのような庭園を散策する時、あなたは散り落ちた椿の花に、そばを飛び過ぎてゆくトンボによって草の葉が揺れていることに、乾きつつあるナラの木の葉がキノコにぴったりくっついているのに、あるいは、霜が明るい赤いベリーの上で輝いているのに気が付くかもしれない。細やかなこれらひとつひとつが霊感を与え世界中の詩歌を生み出している。日本では、霊感を受けてしばしば俳句として知られている独特な詩歌のジャンルを生み出している。

山の朝―

赤いベリーの藪じゅうに

ちっちゃな塊の雪が

俳句はこれらの細かいことひとつひとつをとらえて、鋭い認識と洞察によってつかの間の瞬間を表現しようする、そして詩人や読者―あるいは聞き手―が普遍的な真正なるものを分かち合い、そして賛美するために記録する。

最近の映画をクリックして消す...

長いすのクッション

またふくらむ

俳句は自然がテーマの詩であるが、人間性がテーマの詩でもある。俳句は読者に感情を与え、自然の中での人間的な存在を示す。全ての俳句が美しさについて詠まれているわけではなく、俳句は真正のものは何かについて詠まれている。

私たちは詩のイメージ、意味の認識、そして季節への言及に対して感情的な反応をしめす。すぐれた俳句を読む時、私たちは詩人が経験したことを経験してみたい気持ちに精神的にそして感情的にもなります。しかし、私たちはどんなことを感じるべきか言われなくてもそのようにしているのである。私たちは言葉を通じてただ単に見、触り、味わい、聞きそして匂いをかぐのである ― そしてこのように感じるのである。私たちが自分一人で理解できるように詩人が詩の言外に入念に残したことを直感的に跳び込むように感じ取り、理解するのである。これが俳句の魔術であり、日本の庭園はこの魔術を最大限に活用する理想の場である。

冬の風 ―

凧の糸がからまっている

庭の格子に

日本庭園であなたは散策し、池、灌木、花、魚、小鳥に気がつく。あるいは名前を覚え、細かいことに一つずつ気づき、季節の変化に気がつく。偉大な日本の俳聖である芭蕉は、松の木から松の木のことを学び、竹から竹のことを学ぶようにと言った。芭蕉は次のようなことを言わんとしていた。自分自身の基になるところを真正なるものに置くこと、現在の今にあること、そして物事を自分で解釈しないで物事自体を深く新鮮な目で見ること、そしてあなたが今いるところ以外で起こっていることで混乱させられないこと、そしてあなたが今現在の瞬間になしていること以外に起こっていることに混乱させられないことなどを言いたかったのである。庭園で感じることについての俳句を詠むことによって、あなたはその庭園をもっとわくわくする活気に満ちた場所にすることができる、そして他の人たちが詠んだ俳句を学習し、庭園で他の人たちと俳句を分かち合うことによって、あなたも経験を豊かにすることができる。

チューリップ祭り―

全ての車の色

駐車場の中の

それでは俳句はどんなものだろうか。自然あるいは人間性への深い認識の瞬間をとらえて表現する簡潔な詩である、そしてポーズあるいは並置(日本語では切れ)そして季節への言及(季語)の技法を使う詩である。詩の二つの部分の並置は読者がその関連性を理解することによって自分で決着させることのできる緊張を創り出す。季節への言及により詩はとても現実的で現在の時だけでなく各季節の持つ隠喩から得られる連想の見事な広がりに基礎を置いている。同じような季節の基盤を使う他の詩にも言えることである。物事への反応よりもむしろ物事それ自体について書くことによってあなたは上手に俳句を詠むことができます。

古い羊毛のセーター

納屋毎に取られた

雪堤から出てきた

俳句は3行の5-7-5の音節の型で書かれる単にそのような詩形であると誤解されることがよくある。その型は日本語で書かれる伝統的な俳句(厳密には音節でなく拍で音を数えるけれども)にもあてはまるが、俳句に打ち込んで英語で俳句を詠んでいる大多数の詩人には使われていません。また、俳句というジャンルは、俳句の名称をつけることを主張するがその俳句のどれもきちんとした形で高いレベルに美学を展開していない「ジョーク(冗談)」的なもので俳句本来の質が低下させられていることがあまりにも目につくことである。

英語で詠む俳句は学校で「5-7-5の音節」からなると間違って教えられているが、そのような形に焦点を与えることと英語での俳句として間違った形になっていることにより、二つの部分の並置からなる構造と季節への言及というもっとずっと重要な特徴が軽視されている。

朝冷え ―

大理石の袋

棚の上で位置を変えている

俳句は典型的な場合は事実に基づく記述(判断や分析を含め、隠喩、直喩、そして他の修辞法を用いること、あるいは主観的な表現は避ける)に根ざしたものであり、そして俳句は何かが暗に示されるように(しばしば人が経験する感情など)それを常にはずして置くようにします。このように十分な思慮により簡単な言語が暗に示すことになるが、それよりも実際に書くことの方がずっと難しいのである。

フランスの哲学者であるロナルド・バーズがかって観察したように、「俳句はこのようなかなり素晴らしい特質を持っていること:そして、私たちが自分でそのようなものを容易に書くことができると常に仮定している」と。

クリスマスのために家へ

私の子供時代の机の引き出し

空っぽ

英語では、俳句は自然あるいは人間性、もしくは、自然の状況の中での人間性についての今ここでの認識のある瞬間(「アハ」瞬間)を客観的に暗示する、そして設定された音節型を使わない三行でたいてい呈示される。

俳句は典型的な場合言葉が意味するもの以外にタイトル、韻、あるいは、言葉それ自体に(あるいは詩人の巧妙さに)注意を呼ぶような他の表現を避ける。

アメリカの俳句の開拓者であるジェームズ・W・ハケットはこの話題に関してアドバイスをした。「俳句は月をさす指のようなものだ。もし、その指に宝石の飾りがついていれば、人はもう月を見ないのです」とハケットは言いました。

本当に、俳句は不明瞭だったりあるいは私的なものであるような意図で書かれていません、そしてジャック・ケローアックがかって書いたように、俳句はポリッジのように簡単であるべきです。

温かな冬の晩 ―

椅子が傾いていた

詩が読まれた後に

日本の庭園が霊感を与えて詩歌を生み出すことができるだけでなく、世界の他の庭園もそうすることができます。俳句は感覚による認識の手段であり、心に留める手段であり、全範囲に渡って存在の本質を見渡す詩的な窓のようなものである。あなたがたは日本の庭園の中にはぐくまれた俳句の感性を受けいれて、日常の世界の他の分野に応用することができる。俳句を詠み、世界をもっと幅広い視野で見ながらありふれたことをおどろくべきことにすることができる。

The Japanese Garden Celebrates 50 Years!
Sunday, June 6th 2010

This three-and-a-half acre formal garden, located within the Washington Park Arboretum, was designed and constructed under the supervision of world-renowned Japanese garden designer Juki Iida in 1960. Since then it has won the hearts of locals who appreciate its artfully-placed trees, shrubs, flowers, stones, lanterns, ponds, paths and bridges that create a harmonious balance of northwest and Japanese garden design.

  

HOURS – 2010 Season

Feb 16 – Mar 21 – Tues-Sun – 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Mar 23 – May 2 – Tues-Sun – 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
May 3 – Aug 15 – Mon-Sun – 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Aug 16 – Sep 20 – Mon-Sun – 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Sep 21 – Oct 17 – Tues-Sun – 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Oct 19 – Oct 31 – Tues-Sun – 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Nov 2 – Nov 14 – Tues-Sun – 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

* Garden closing times are subject to weather, available light, and impacts of daylight savings time.

* Admission rates and Garden activities vary according with our events schedule.

 

I sincerely hope that you will visit Seattle Japanese Garden, and that you will enjoy audio tour by Michael, and write haiku. 

The next posting ‘Haiku by Narayanan Raghunathan’  appears on June 19.

― Hidenori  Hiruta

 

Int’l Haiku Spring Festival 2010 has just started on May 12 on the website of the Akita International Haiku Network in Akita, Northern Honshu, Japan.

At the same time 2010 Bath Japanese Festival , our sister festival, has begun and gives Festival Launch Party in Bath, UK, this evening.

Masuda Aika(桝田愛佳), a haiga painter, and her mother Masuda Junko (桝田純子), a haiku poet, take part in the party as their special guests from Akita (秋田), Japan.

They exhibit haiga (俳画) and haiku (俳句), showing how to paint haiga for the participants in Bath on May 13.

They also enjoy staying with Alan Summer’s family in Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire for four days, from May 11 till 14.

Here in Akita, we would like to share the delights and high spirits of our festival with each other, reading aloud haiku by Roberta Beary,  first of all. 

Roberta Beary, a haiku poet, in Washington, USA, contributed her haiku book, ‘nothing left to say’  to us in celebration of the first anniversary of the opening of the Akita International Haiku Network.

 

Roberta is a haiku friend of Alan’s and mine.

She says in her e-mail as follows:

Hi Hidenori
Thank you for including haiku from my book, ‘nothing left to say’ at the Int’l Haiku Spring Festival in partnership with the 2010 Bath Japanese Festival. I got to meet Alan Summers last September when I traveled to London. He is an amazing person!!

Here is the short introduction: Roberta Beary (www.robertabeary.com) was born and raised in New York City. In 1990 she moved to Japan for five years of haiku study. Her individual poems, an unconventional hybrid of haiku and senryu, have been honored throughout North America, Europe and Asia for their innovative style. Her book of haiku and senryu, The Unworn Necklace (Snapshot Press, 2007), selected as a William Carlos Williams Book Award finalist (Poetry Society of America), was named a Haiku Society of America Merit Book Award prize winner. She also co-edited two Haiku Society of America anthologies both of which were named Merit Book Award winners. Her most recent work, a chapbook titled ‘nothing left to say'(edited by Michael Dylan Welch) is the 20th title in the Hexagram Series of master haiku poets.

Roberta Beary

Here is a photo of me taken in December 2005 at the Kumamoto Hotel in Japan. I was in Kumamoto to receive the Grand Prize in the Kusumakura International Haiku Contest. The prize included a trip to Japan! My winning haiku: thunder/the roses shift/into shadow

 

Here is the photo of me which appears on my book of haiku, The Unworn Necklace, winner of the Poetry Society of America Finalist Award. A hardcover edition will be published this year by Snapshot Press, UK.

 

Here is a picture of my husband, the writer Frank Stella, and me taken at The White House Christmas Tour 2009. President Obama was out of town that day!

  

Now I present the former 17 haiku from her book.

I tell you about her haiku in Japanese, which helps our Japanese readers appreciate them. My interpretation isn’t given as a form of Japanese haiku. 

nothing left to say

an empty nest

fills with snow

 

言うことは何も残されていない

一つの空の巣

雪で一杯である

 

 

break up 

my daughter’s voice cracks

across two continents

 

崩壊―

娘の声がかすれる

二つの大陸を横切って

 

 

blackout

my son speaks a secret

i always knew

 

暗転―

息子が秘密を明かす

ずっと知っていた

 

 

blue moon

dad’s phone message

unslurred

 

青みがかった月

パパのフォーンメッセージ

明瞭な発音だった

 

 

third blizzard

the untuned piano’s

middle c

 

三回目のブリザード―

未調律のピアノの

中間のc

 

snowed in

the dog clicks

from room to room

 

雪が中に舞い込んだ

犬が意気投合する

部屋から部屋へ

 

 

just after midnight

he corrects

her auld lang syne

 

ちょうど真夜中過ぎ

彼が正す

彼女のオールドラングサインを

 

talking divorce

he pours his coffee

then mine

 

離婚について話し合う

彼がコーヒーを注ぐ

それから私に

 

last train

a can rolls the length

of the quiet car

 

終列車

缶が一つ端から端まで転がる

静かな車両の

 

so much silence

on a path

lit by fireflies

 

底知れない静寂

小径の上

蛍が明かりを灯す

 

rivermoon

we run

out of words

 

川に月が

私たちは走り出す

言葉より先に

 

quiet rain

…the deeper quiet

of uncut roses

 

静かな雨

...もっと深い静けさが

伸び盛りのバラたちに

 

piano practice

in the room above me

my father shouting

 

ピアノの稽古

上の部屋で

父が大声で言っている

 

talk of war

 the spin cycle’s

steady hum

 

戦争の話

飛行機のきりもみ降下の円形の

変わらないブーンという音

 

culling figs

 mother and son

speaking again

 

いちじくを摘みながら

母と息子が

また話している

 

snowbound

 reading out loud

to an empty room

 

雪で閉じこめられた

声を大きく朗読をする

空っぽの部屋に

 

not hearing it

 till the cat stirs

birdsong

 

まだ耳にしていない

猫がかき立てるまで

鳥の歌を

 

The latter 18 haiku of ‘nothing to say’ by Roberta Beary appear in the future posting on the website, when we hold our festival again.

Last of all, let me decorate our on line festival with the photo flowers presented by Patricia Lidia, a haiku poet, in Romania.

The next posting ‘Haiku by Helen McCarthy for Int’l Haiku Spring Festival 2010 (2)’ appears tomorrow on May 13.

 

Hidenori Hiruta

The Haiku International Association(HIA)(国際俳句交流協会), a nonprofit organization aimed at promoting haiku globally, celebrated the 20th anniversary of its establishment with a symposium titled Haiku Worldwide ― Present and Future on November 28, Tokyo.

 First of all, HIA President Akito Arima (会長有馬朗人) gave a speech of celebration as a greeting.

 

Secondly, they announced the results of the 11th HIA Haiku contest(HIA俳句大会).

Here we post the names of haiku poets and their haiku selected as prize winners and honorable mentions (Non-Japanese Section). We also post their haiku translated into Japanese.

木村聡雄選  (Selected by Toshio Kimura)

 

特選 (Prize Winners)        

Tatjana Stefanovic (Serbia)       タチアナ ステファノヴィッチ(セルビア)

Gliding to sea               海へと滑る  

towers of sandy castle.          砂の城楼

Long lizard’s tail              長き蜥蜴の尾 

 

Olga Hooper (U.S.A)          オルガ フーバー(アメリカ)

late autumn                ガラス瓶に 

moonlight preserved          閉じこめられた

in a glass jar                晩秋の月明かり

 

入選 (Honorable Mentions)

David Dayson (UK)          ディビッド ディソン(イギリス)

ghosts of distant conflict         遙かな諍い 

still haunt                    亡霊ら未だ彷徨う―

the unarmoured soul           武具つけぬ魂

Roberta Beary (U.S.A)         ロベルタ ベアリー(アメリカ)

(She is a fellow haiku poet of mine)    (私の句友) 

 

new coolness                新涼の

soldiers’ black boots crunch      黒き軍靴が踏み砕く   

leaves of gold                黄金色の落葉

 

Zeljka Vucinic Jambre (Croatia) ジェルカ ヴチニッチ ヤンブレ(クロアチア)

all the reed                 葦すべて

combed in one way           一方向へ梳かれ  

the wind in a marsh           沼風

Petar Tchouhov (Bulgaria)       ペタ チュホヴ(ブルガリア)

full moon                   満月

the hole                   彼の結婚指輪の

of his wedding ring            

 

木内徹選  (Selected by Toru Kiuchi)

 

特選 (Prize Winners)

Tomislav Z. Vujcic (Serbia)       トミスラヴ・ヴィチッチ(セルビア)

Two invalids ―               二人の傷病兵 ― 

me disabled veteran           不具の退役軍人である私と 

and a deer                   鹿  

Owen Bullock (New Zealand)      オウェン・ビュロック(ニュージーランド)

waterfowl                  水辺の鳥が

drift into                   さまよい入っていく  

photos                    写真の中 

 

入選 (Honorable Mentions)

Pamela A. Babusci (U.S.A)       パミーラ・A・バプーシ(アメリカ)   

night of silence               夜のしじま 

I found a river stone            私は河で拾った石を見つけた 

in my pocket                 ポケットのなかに 

Kirsten Cliff  (New Zealand)      カーステン・クリフ(ニュージーランド)

winter afternoon              冬の午後

one empty space               一つの空きが

in the library carpark           図書館の駐車場に

 

Naomi Y. Brown  (U.S.A)        ナオミ・Y・ブラウン(アメリカ)

moonlight ―                         月光― 

Spanish moss hung from tree  サルオガセモドキが木から垂れ下がる 

ghost swaying                         幽霊が揺れる  

 

Tatjana Stefanovic  (Serbia)      タチアナ・ステファノヴィッチ(セルビア)

summer shower:               夏の夕立 ―

Donald Duck’s head peeping        ドナルドダックの頭が覗く 

out of gutter-pipe               排水溝のパイプから

Thirdly, they gave the symposium(シンポジウム), whose panelists were four haiku representatives from the United Kingdom, the U.S., Germany and Croatia, and HIA President Akito Arima.  

They gave a lecture on principles and present circumstances of haiku and discussed and suggested further information for future haiku.

I was deeply impressed with their viewpoints on the meaning and roles of haiku in their daily lives, and also the values of haiku.

I was also impressed with the prediction by HIA President Akito Arima.

He predicted as follows:

Haiku will survive as the shortest form of poetry.

Haiku will have more things to do with nature.

More and more young people will write and read haiku.

More haiku poets will share their haiku on the Internet.

Global haiku meet or exchange will increase on the Internet.

Here we post the panelists and the coordinator and their haiku.

Annie Bachini, President of the British Haiku Society

アニー・バッチーニ(イギリス俳句協会長)

sliding on and off       つかず離れず滑りゆく 

the river’s edge        川のへりを 

autumn leaves         秋の葉が 

Lenard Moore, president of the Haiku Society of America

レナード・ムーア(アメリカ俳句協会会長)

autumn sunset        秋の夕陽

helicopter rises        ヘリコプターが上がる

from the heliport       ヘリポートから

Marijan Cekoji, president of the Croatian Haiku Society

マリアン・チェコリ(クロアチア俳句協会会長)

here, behind the Crown            ここ、木のてっぺんの後ろに

of a tree the sun going down     夕陽が沈む

to the next side of the world      この世界の向こう側へ

Stephan Wolfschutz, president of the German Haiku Society

シュテファン・ヴォルフシュッツ(ドイツ俳句協会会長)

the pebbles             小石が

under my feet          私の足下に

Buddha’s birthday       仏陀の誕生日

HIA President Akito Arima

有馬朗人(国際俳句交流協会会長)

looking for

something lost ―       失ひしものを探しに冬帽子

wearing a winter cap

 

Tsunehiko Hoshino, HIA vice-president as coordinator

星野恒彦(国際俳句交流協会副会長)司会

Walking a little apart     

from its shadow ―      影すこし離して行くや朝の蟻

early morning ant

 

Last of all, we post the party(懇親会) held in order for participants to talk about haiku with each other, share and exchange haiku and ideas, and deepen friendship.

Many speeches were made and haiku were presented on the stage too.

Honorary President of Modern Haiku Association, Tota Kaneko(現代俳句協会名誉会長 金子兜太), gave a speech of congratulations.

 

The Fruit grove

is the isolated island of mine,   果樹園がシャツ一枚の俺の孤島

wearing only a shirt

 

What impressed me most was that Marshall Hryciuk, a Canadian haiku poet, demonstrated haiku by sign language on the stage.

I made friends with him and Karen Sohne, a Canadian haiku poet.

  

They presented haiku book and haiku publications to me, and I also presented our yearly pamphlet on ‘Akita International Haiku Network’  to them in return.

In the haiku book titled ‘Arizona to Crete’, I found that Marshall Hryciuk won first prize at Eighth HIA Haiku Contest, Non-Japanese Section, Tokyo 2006.

Marshall Hryciuk (Canada)        マーシャル・リシック(カナダ)

in darkness              闇のなか

i await                    我が声を 

my voice                 待つ

 

Karen Sohne recited her haiku to me.  

 カレン・ソーニー(カナダ)

steps cut into stone        階段の

in each corner           石の隅ごと

petals                  花びらよ

We parted, saying ‘Good Luck!’. 

And we promised that we would exchange and share haiku by e-mail and on the website.

                         By  Hidenori Hiruta

                         HIA member